The lot of you

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Nucleara

Senior Member
Get out of my house, the lot of you !
I 've never ,ever seen this before. All the time I've seen only "a lot" or "lots of" . This appears in an example of the word "lot" in my dictionary. After I tried to understand the meaning of it now I'm still unsure if it means "all of you" : Get out of my house, all of you !

I still want to confirm again that I've never, ever seen this way of using "lot" together with the article "the" . I don't know if this is typical or not for native speakers, but I've never heard people say it before.

Thanks : )
 
  • Languagethinkerlover

    Senior Member
    English-British and U.S.
    Thank you very much owlman for your quick reply : )
    but I've never heard it before, is this typical for you ? Or it's an old use ?

    You're translation was excellent.


    I've heard its (the lot of you/the lotta ya...sorry bad at phonetics) usage more in the U.K. I do not think it's something commonly said in the U.S.
     

    Apostrophic

    New Member
    English
    'the lot of you' is quite common in Ireland.

    For example, in a household of unruly children, the mother says 'get out of the house, the lot of you, and leave me in peace' (or at least my mother used to say it!)
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Haha, really? :p
    Thank you so much for clarifying it to me , the lot of you !
    Another little bit of clarification. My experience of this expression is like Apostrophic's - it's probably used in a mood of exasperation or pretend exasperation and probably by a parent or other person in authority.
     

    Nucleara

    Senior Member
    Another little bit of clarification. My experience of this expression is like Apostrophic's - it's probably used in a mood of exasperation or pretend exasperation and probably by a parent or other person in authority.
    Thank you panjandrum, a new question has come up then --It's never used in a humorous way ,right ?
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Thank you panjandrum, a new question has come up then --It's never used in a humorous way ,right ?
    Oh, yes, certainly. That's what I meant by pretend exasperation.
    Suppose I found a bunch of kids jumping around on my raspberry patch, I could yell at them "Get away from there the lot of you." I would be rather annoyed.
    On the other hand, I might well say to a bunch of clamouring kids at a birthday party "Get out into the garden the lot of you." It would be said with a smile and affection, and we'd all be amused.
     

    Raggmopp

    New Member
    English
    To my American ear, this sounds British, and even moreso Irish. The sense of the word "lot" here is, I believe, as in an "auction lot;" that is, a collective that I could grab with both fists (and as such, is often intended humorously or with mock anger.) It is often heard in movies where an Irish woman is dealing with a group of wild children or unruly adult males. A phrase which bears similar meaning and is even more humorous in modern usage is "kit and kaboodle."
     
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