The man < who didn't attend / not attending > [reduced relative clause]

Discussion in 'English Only' started by Calui, Mar 4, 2016.

  1. Calui

    Calui New Member

    Vietnamese
    The man who didn't attend the meeting yesterday is a very famous lecturer.
    --> The man not attending the meeting yesterday is a very famous lecture.
    My question is that whether the second sentence is correct or not. Can you make this clear?
    Thank you.
     
  2. owlman5

    owlman5 Senior Member

    Colorado
    English-US
    The second sentence looks like an odd replacement for the first one. The grammar is possible, but I don't see any advantage in rephrasing the sentence like that.

    I'm sorry, but I can't think of any clear guidance regarding when to use these "reduced clauses". When I use them, they are usually fairly short and they are often the objects of prepositions: Are you looking at the girl standing on the stairs?
     
    Last edited: Mar 4, 2016
  3. velisarius Senior Member

    Greece
    British English (Sussex)
    It's very odd to use the present participle for a past action. With a sentence in the present tense it sounds better, but it is still rather odd, especially with the negative. Here it sounds reasonable in the present tense, and dropping the negative:

    The man who is attending the meeting today is a very famous lecturer.

    The man attending the meeting today is a very famous lecturer
     

Share This Page

Loading...