The manager invited cordially

learning_grenglish

Senior Member
India
The manager invited all the employees cordially for his marriage.
The manager invited, for his marriage, all the employees cordially.
The manager invited cordially all the employees for his marriage.
The manager invited cordially, for his marriage, all the employees.

Which version is more correct?

For me, all are equally correct because, to my ear, the all rings with same meaning.
 
  • Trisia

    Senior Member
    Romanian
    They all sound the same to me too. That's because I wouldn't use any of them :eek:

    I would use:
    The manager cordially invited all the employees to his wedding.
     

    Matching Mole

    Senior Member
    England, English
    To achieve natural expression here, you should reverse "invited cordially" to "cordially invited".
    "The manager cordially invited all the employees to his wedding." Note the italicized phrase, too. "For his marriage" is incorrect here.
     

    tepatria

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    The manager cordially invited all the employees to his wedding would be the natural way to say it in English. We usually say cordially invited, not invited cordially, though both are grammatically correct. When we are talking about the celebration and ceremony of the union we call it the wedding. The marriage is the lifetime after the wedding.
     

    musanim

    New Member
    English - US
    >The manager cordially invited, to his wedding, all the employees.
    >Is the above version correct?

    Actually, technically, that sentence is grammatically correct, but it is not idiomatic. To my ear, it sounds like the kind of construction used by eastern European speakers for whom English is a second language. A typical native speaker would probably say "the manager invited all the employees to his wedding." I omitted "cordially" because the word is seldom used except in formal contexts (such as invitations, the closing of a letter, etc.).
     
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