The meaning of the word "reside".

Rilakkuma

New Member
Japanese
This sentence comes from a Japanese News paper, the Nikkey Weekly April 19, 2010.

President and CEO Katsuji Fujimoto, 66, will reside as chairman.

I looked up a dictionary, but I could not find the appropriate meaning. How can you reword the word "reside" in this sentence?
 
  • Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    Welcome Rilakkuma. :)

    This is not a use of reside I am familiar with either. The first thing that occurs to me is that it is a typographical error, and should say "will resign as chairman." What does the story tell us Katsuji Fujimoto is doing?
     

    Rilakkuma

    New Member
    Japanese
    Thank you, guys.

    It is a typographical error? That's the furthest thing from my mind!

    The head line of this article is the following: Next NSG head another foreigner.

    NSG is the Japanese company called Nippon Sheet Glass Co., the world's second-largest glassmaker.

    It announced April 15 that it has recruited Craig Naylor,former group vice president of DuPont as its next president and chief executive officer.
    He will assume the position June 29.

    According to the nespaper, that's why Mr. Fujimoto will reside as chairman.
     

    Cameljockey

    Senior Member
    British English
    Merriam-Webster dot com gives one definition of reside as 'to be in residence as the incumbent of a benefice or office', so it seems correct. I have heard it before.
     

    mikun

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    Hi,
    After reading NSG announcement in 2008, appointing foreign people to president & CEO, but remainnig decision power of payment, personnel chang & etc to the corporate committees governed by former Japanese executive director, I feel the meaning of 'reside' is something like 'reside in'.
    My longman dictionary says, 'if a power, right etc resides in something or someone it belongs to them. Executive power resides in the president.'
     

    Cameljockey

    Senior Member
    British English
    Yes, reside can also be used in the way you describe, power can be described as resting or residing in something or someone, but that is not the meaning in the news item you quoted. It is not describing the power that the Chairman possesses, it is only reporting that he holds the title of office.
     

    Rilakkuma

    New Member
    Japanese
    Merriam-Webster dot com gives one definition of reside as 'to be in residence as the incumbent of a benefice or office', so it seems correct. I have heard it before.

    would you mind rephrasing the part "'to be in residence as the incumbent of a benefice or office"?
     

    Cameljockey

    Senior Member
    British English
    would you mind rephrasing the part "'to be in residence as the incumbent of a benefice or office"?
    Of course. To be in residence (in this context) means, as we said before, merely holding/having been awarded the title or office in question.

    It might be confusing to imagine also, but you could additionally say that the title currently resides in that person. The person resides in the office, the title (and the accompanying powers and authority conferred by the title) reside in the person.

    An incumbent is a person who currently holds a position or title.

    A benefice is a position held in the Christian Church which grants the holder assets with which to make a living (rather than just a salary, for example). It's not particularly relevant to our topic as we are referring to any title or office (company chairman, in the case of our topic ).
     

    Rilakkuma

    New Member
    Japanese
    Thank you very much, Cameljockey-san!

    I looked up the phrase "in residence", but I only find out that the meaning of this phrase was "stationed in somewhare", "live in a dorm" and so on. I was confused but I totally understand the meaning. I appreciate it.
     
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