The men are limp, they feel a doom somewhere, and they go about as if there was nothing to be done

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longxianchen

Senior Member
chinese
Hi,
Here are some words from the novel Lady Chatterley's Lover(page 443, chapter 19) by DH Lawrence (planetebook,here):
(background: Mellors got a job on a farm.He wrote to Connie, saying that the pits were working badly, and that he objected to nationalization.…)

We’ve got this great industrial population(=the population for coal mining), and they’ve got to be fed, so the damn show has to be kept going somehow. The women talk a lot more than the men, nowadays, and they are a sight more cock-sure. The men are limp, they feel a doom somewhere, and they go about as if there was nothing to be done. Anyhow, nobody knows what should be done in spite of all the talk, the young ones get mad because they’ve no money to spend.

The sentence in blue is quite confusing to me. How should I understand it please?
Now I rephrase it as:
The men are spiritless(=limp), they feel a doom to a certain extent(=somewhere), but(=and) they fool around(=go about) as if they were at a loss about what to do(=there was nothing to be done)

Thank you in advance.
 
Last edited:
  • MilkyBarKid

    Senior Member
    British English
    The men are dispirited, with a general feeling of pessimism and despondency. They carry on with their lives, but as if resigned to their fate, their doom.
     

    wandle

    Senior Member
    English - British
    'A doom somewhere' means a fate which is going to happen, but they cannot see it, or predict what will bring it on them.
    'Go about' means 'walk around' in the sense of going to and from work and living their ordinary lives.
     

    longxianchen

    Senior Member
    chinese
    Thank you both very much. But does the and in and they go about equal but?
    And does there was nothing to be done mean they were at a loss what to do?
     
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