The metaphor IBM typically uses for Watson is one of a “capable and knowledgeable colleague”

tesoke

Senior Member
USA
Persian
Hi, during the sentences, from "How IBM Watson will impact our fight against cancer" by Washingtonpost, I think that "one of" is superfluous. Am I wrong? Why? Thanks for any help.

Keep in mind, however, that the goal of IBM’s cognitive computing initiative for health care is not intended for Watson to replace physicians, nurses and other medical practitioners. The metaphor IBM typically uses for Watson is one of a “capable and knowledgeable colleague” who can respond faster, read more and crunch more data than humans.
 
  • Chez

    Senior Member
    English English
    In this sentence, it is not strictly needed.

    However, it's used sort of to refer back to 'the metaphor'. It's meaning is perhaps closer to a longer phrase – the metaphor we are talking about is one (a metaphor) that talks about/describes the Watson as "......
     

    Nizolan

    New Member
    UK
    English - UK; Hungarian
    If we're being proper, I think at least the "of" is actually needed. See the following examples:

    1. The metaphor IBM typically uses ... is one of a “capable and knowledgeable colleague”

    2. The metaphor IBM typically uses ... is that of a “capable and knowledgeable colleague”

    3. The metaphor IBM typically uses ... is of a “capable and knowledgeable colleague”

    4. The metaphor IBM typically uses ... is a “capable and knowledgeable colleague”

    1, 2, 3 are good; 4 is fine colloquially but seems slightly wrong on inspection. The metaphor is one that talks about a capable and knowledgeable colleague (as Chez says); it's not itself a capable and knowledgeable colleague.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top