'<The more's the reason>,' returned she, 'for saying that it won't do. No! That it won't do.~'

park sang joon

Senior Member
Korean
The protagonist's mother, a very young widow came back home with a man from village gathering at night.
The only maid Peggotty criticizes her for the thing.

"Then, how can you dare," said my motherㅡ"you know I don't mean how can you dare, Peggotty, but how can you have the heartㅡto make me so uncomfortable and say such bitter things to me, when you are well aware that I haven't, out of this place, a single friend to turn to?"
"The more's the reason," returned Peggotty, "for saying that it won't do. No! That it won't do.~"
[David Copperfield by Charles Dickens]
I'd like to know what "The more's the reason" means.
Thank you in advance for your help.
 
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  • Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    That's all the more reason for me to say that it won't do/for you to be careful.

    That is another reason. That reinforces the reason I gave you earlier.
     

    park sang joon

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Thank you, Barque, for your so very kind answer. :)
    Then I was wondering if "the more's the reason" is an abbreviation of "(That all) the more is the reason."
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    In today's English I would say "All the more reason for saying..." Both phrases are idioms. I don't think there's any abbreviation: an idiom is what it is.
     

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I agree with Velisarius that Dickens' idiom isn't much used these days, I'm not even sure it was used much in Dickens' time.

    Peggotty comes from a family of fishermen, so this may be Dickens using popular speech, or even malapropism.
     
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