the most influential, literate and scandalous of these irrepressible women

Chinese Su

Senior Member
Chinese
Source:Birth of the Salon

The salons were, of course, also nests of gossip. In fact, many of the stories recounted in this dense but entertaining book evoke "Dallas" in wigs and corsets. Amid a large cast of characters, Craveri, an Italian professor of French literature, helpfully highlights the most influential, literate and scandalous of these irrepressible women. Even so, in Teresa Waugh's stylish translation, this is a book to be taken in manageable bites.

Question: ... highlights the most influential, literate and scandalous what? of these irrepressible women. Thank you :)

Is it just a way of telling us that Craveri helpfully highlights the most influential, literate and scandalous women among these irrepressible women? The first women was left out for the sake of brevity. Have I understood correctly? Thank you :)
 
  • lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    It is the women themselves who are influential, literate and scandalous.

    There's no need to say "women" twice. As in:
    The smallest, cutest and fluffiest of the black kittens.
    NOT: The smallest, cutest and fluffiest kittens of the black kittens.
     
    Last edited:

    Chinese Su

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    It is the women themselves who are influential, literate and scandalous.
    Thank you for helping me with my question, Lingobingo :D I think I've got your point!

    What do you think about the following? I'm not quite sure about it... Thank you :)

    Is it just a way of telling us that Craveri helpfully highlights the most influential, literate and scandalous women among these irrepressible women? The first women was left out for the sake of brevity. Have I understood correctly? Thank you :)
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    No, not really. I don't see a need to assume that anything has been left out.

    If you were to pick out "the most influential of them", nothing in that phrase has been omitted — and the construction is the same.
     

    Chinese Su

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    No, not really. I don't see a need to assume that anything has been left out.
    I see, thank you so much for your further explanation, Lingobingo :D

    There's no need to say "women" twice. As in:
    The smallest, cutest and fluffiest of the black kittens.
    NOT: The smallest, cutest and fluffiest kittens of the black kittens.
    Here is how I would interpret your message:

    I don't see a need to assume that anything has been left out. There is no need to say "kittens" twice, as in The smallest, cutest and fluffiest of the black kittens, although the sentence means The smallest, cutest and fluffiest kittens of the black kittens.


    Have I understood correctly? Thank you :)
     
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