the mystical food of the sacrament?

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sky753

Senior Member
Chinese
Hello Everyone,

I can't get one of the meaning of the word mystical. And from the dictionary it is defined as "having a spiritual meaning or reality that is neither apparent to the senses nor obvious to the intelligence" with the example of " the mystical food of sacrament. Can you further explain "the mystical food of sacrament" to me? I can't quite understand it?


Regards

Sky
 
  • natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    I assume 'the mystical food of sacrament' refers to the wafer or bread in what is called the Communion or the Eucharist or the mass in various churches. The Roman Catholic church for example holds that the wafer becomes the body of Christ, and in this way the wafer has a 'spiritual meaning or reality' that is not apparent.
     

    sky753

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    I assume 'the mystical food of sacrament' refers to the wafer or bread in what is called the Communion or the Eucharist or the mass in various churches. The Roman Catholic church for example holds that the wafer becomes the body of Christ, and in this way the wafer has a 'spiritual meaning or reality' that is not apparent.
    Thanks for your replies! But I can't fully understand it. I hope more repies can be given here
     

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    One of the problems here, Sky, is that many people are unfamiliar with the concept of a sacrament. Young Roman Catholics are taught a form of words to explain what is meant, but it's difficult to explain in everyday terms without causing offence. People's views on the importance of these things are very different.

    I think Natkretep's answer is entirely correct, but you say you are still unclear, so at the risk of offending someone, I'll try to expand.

    Many Christian churches have sacraments: these are individual acts of magic, which can only be performed by priests and involve the dispensation of grace, which is a codeword for the power and goodness of God. There are typically seven of these magical acts: baptism, confirmation, ordination, supreme unction (the last rites), the eucharist, absolution (penance), marriage. These acts of dispensation of grace constitute important parts of the power and special function of a priest, and are the way in which churches pass authority down from one generation to another - Christ appointed Peter, Peter ordained his followers, his followers ordained their followers, and so on.

    The problem is that Christians don't like the word magic in this context, because it has strongly pagan (i.e. non-Christian) overtones.

    The mystical food of the sacrament? In the Eucharist, as Natkretep explains, some Christians hold that the bread or wafer is magically turned into the body of Christ, by the action of the priest. Eating the wafer is seen, not as an act of cannibalism, but as a means of uniting oneself symbolically with Christ and by extension with Christians everywhere. The word mystical is preferred to magical, for the reasons I have given; it is used by people to add mystery or aura to a process which had deep religious significance for them. The sacrament is the Eucharist. The food is the wafer or bread, symbolizing the body of Christ. It's mystical, because it is mystically transformed by the priest's action into the basis for an act of supreme importance for the church, communion, the uniting of its members into a single coherent unit consisting of people with common aims and beliefs.
     
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    shawnee

    Senior Member
    English - Australian
    Fantastic answer TT. I just though it worth including the wine dispensed during the Eucharist, as it is symbolic of the blood of Christ.
     
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