The next thing you know, you'll be teaching me to say yes

gettare

Banned
English
Ciao,

"Wow! The next thing you know, you'll be teaching me to say 'yes'."

Accidenti! Il prossima cosa si sa mi imparai dire "si"

Grazie
 
  • miri

    Senior Member
    Italy/Italian
    "La prossima cosa che farai (?) sarà insegnarmi a dire di sì"

    I don't really understand why "you know"... Does it mean "in men che non si dica"? Or is there a comma before it?
     

    gettare

    Banned
    English
    Miri,

    It's really an expression not a question. It is like a parasite in the American throat, some people can't breathe without saying you know. In this case it's rhetorically a little less unpretty, though. it's a sort of bonding or gluing agent between speaker whether real or imaginary, the speaker probably believing that because she has uttered it, somehow they've become sharers of some kind of commonality -- yet it's just an empty regurgitation of pedestrianism -- and you can quote me.
     

    Uafa81

    Senior Member
    Miri,

    It's really an expression not a question. It is like a parasite in the American throat, some people can't breathe without saying you know. In this case it's rhetorically a little less unpretty, though. it's a sort of bonding or gluing agent between speaker whether real or imaginary, the speaker probably believing that because she has uttered it, somehow they've become sharers of some kind of commonality -- yet it's just an empty regurgitation of pedestrianism -- and you can quote me.
    Interesting! :) ...a sort of stock phrase?
     

    rubuk

    Senior Member
    Italiano
    ...

    I don't really understand why "you know"... Does it mean "in men che non si dica"? Or is there a comma before it?
    Ciao Miri, guarda qui:"Wow! The next thing, you'll be teaching me to say 'yes'."

    Gli americani dicono You know come facevano certi italiani intercalando il discorso con il maledetto cioè, in questa frase mancava una virgola e comunque per la perfetta comprensione bisognava buttare l'You know dalla finestra, ti confonde solo le idee...

    Stef.
     

    Uafa81

    Senior Member
    Ciao Miri, gli americani dicono You know come facevano certi italiani intercalando il discorso con il maledetto cioè, in questa frase mancava una virgola e comunque per la perfetta comprensione bisognava buttare l'You know dalla finestra, ti confonde solo le idee...

    Stef.
    E' il "figa" milanese, te lo dice uno che se l'è sorbito per 4 mesi da un coinquilino. :) Paese che vai, intercalare che trovi. :D
     

    gettare

    Banned
    English
    Neuromatico,

    I don't see that one, thanks. It must have slipped through the crack. But on the surface of what you say "sta a vedere.." I can tell it is not quite what I was looking for. I would like to thank Giovanino for reaching out to help me though.

    Thanks again
     

    miri

    Senior Member
    Italy/Italian
    Thank you Stef., Giovanni and Neuro!:)
    I know that "you know" (sorry for the play on words:)) is a stock phrase (un intercalare),the same as "like", but I was puzzled because there was no comma before it. Then I had the feeling that "the next thing you know" might be a sort of set phrase meaning something like "before you can say Jack Robinson" (old-fashioned) or "in the blink of an eye", "before you know", "no sooner said than done". In Italian it would be "in men che non si dica", "prima che te ne accorga", "detto fatto" or "prima che tu possa dire be'", so I thought that Gettare's sentence could be translated as "Caspita! Detto fatto, mi insegnerai a dire "sì"".

    There is this thread which seems to confirm what I mean. Even though I understand that gettare/Giovanni used "you know" as a stock phrase, could someone be so kind as to tell me if the Italian translations above might be acceptable equivalents for "the next thing you know" or if I am completely off track?:)
     

    anglomania1

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Miri,

    It's really an expression not a question. It is like a parasite in the American throat, some people can't breathe without saying you know. In this case it's rhetorically a little less unpretty, though. it's a sort of bonding or gluing agent between speaker whether real or imaginary, the speaker probably believing that because she has uttered it, somehow they've become sharers of some kind of commonality -- yet it's just an empty regurgitation of pedestrianism -- and you can quote me.
    Hello,
    I think in this case "you know" can't be removed, it's part of the idiom "the next thing you know".
    Maybe it could be translated with something more idiomatic in Italian, what about "prima che te ne rendi conto, mi insegnerai a dire sì"?
    Literally it means "la prossima cosa che saprai", and I think it means that this thing will just come upon you really quickly before you know it.
    Does that make sense?
    Anglo
     

    gettare

    Banned
    English
    Miri, Anglo and Stef,

    Thankyou for bestowing such erudition upon my work (pun my word). A sort of MRI (MIRI) has taken place and now I have a MYRIAD of choices.

    Bless you all
     
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