the night before my <apprehension>

MacDusia

Member
Poland
Hello,
here I am puzzled by the use of the word apprehension in such a sentence:

Thomas Wyatt wrote: "My lord of Suffolk himself can tell that I imputed it [meaning his imprisonment] to him, and not only at the beginning, but even the very night before my apprehension now last."

How should I understand this second part of the sentence: the night before my imprisonment? I'm confused by the ending (now last).

Thanks for any help.
 
  • Barque

    Banned
    Tamil
    You haven't quoted the full sentence. It goes on: ...my apprehension now last; what time I remember my saying unto him for his favour to remit his old undeserved evil will; and to remember "like as he was a mortal man so "to bear no immortal hate in his breast."

    The grammar used was obviously different in those days; this was written in the 16th century. I understand it as: ...and even on the night before the day till which my apprehension (my arrest/confinement) lasted.
     

    MacDusia

    Member
    Poland
    Thanks, it is clear now. I didn't quote the whole sentence because it was just the fragment I had in the book I'm reading (by Alison Weir). In the meantime I also found the whole fragment in another source, which helps understand the quotation better.
     

    AliBadass

    Senior Member
    persian
    From the animation ''Rango'': Rango, the protagonist (a chameleon), talking to himself, acting:

    "Okay, everybody, let's take it from the top. The stage is set, the night moist with apprehension. Alone in her chamber, princess prepares to take her own life."

    What does he mean by saying ''the night moist with apprehension''?
     

    AliBadass

    Senior Member
    persian
    It's this one:
    apprehension - WordReference.com Dictionary of English
    1. suspicion or fear of future trouble; foreboding:
    had apprehensions about the upcoming meeting.
    I was filled with apprehension

    Moist is both the dew and sweat. The author is saying that the dew was the night sweating in tension or fear.
    So it's not ''the night moist'' (one set phrase), it's ''the night was moist'', right? It's kind of literary.
     
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