The nobility <live/lives>[BE please]

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  • Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    It would be "live", but note that using "nobility" here instead of "the nobles" is itself not natural modern English.
    Well, "nobility" and "nobles" mean slightly different things to me, GWB: I might use "nobility" in a modern context, but I wouldn't use "nobles" ....

    But yes, I agree, I'd use "live" in the original sentence:).
     

    alex_ln

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Frankly speaking even I'm not confident about the usage of my word; by using "The nobility" I mean those people who are very rich and do not have any financial problems that ordinary people have.
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    The nobility is the class of nobles in a country and is therefore singular. The plural is nobilities.

    "The nobility attends the race meeting but keeps itself separate from the hoi-poloi."
    "Selling titles is often illegal in countries that actually have nobilities, such as European monarchies."
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Frankly speaking even I'm not confident about the usage of my word; by using "The nobility" I mean those people who are very rich and do not have any financial problems that ordinary people have.
    In that case, I'd probably use "the rich" or "the very rich".

    It would still be "live": The rich live in luxurious houses.

    EDIT: As will be evident from my earlier post, I disagree with Paul's post immediately above:cool:
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Frankly speaking even I'm not confident about the usage of my word; by using "The nobility" I mean those people who are very rich and do not have any financial problems that ordinary people have.
    Ah! The nobility are only those with titles, e.g. Duke, Prince, Earl, Lord, Margrave, Landgrave, Baron, etc.
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    Well, I'm not a BE speaker, but I agree with Loob (posts 3 and 6). In the sense of a class of people (as opposed to a character trait) preceded by the definite article, I consider "nobility" plural. If a group of such were assembled for some event, I wouldn't say, "The nobility was gathered at the palace." I'd say, "The nobility were gathered . . . "
     
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