The noun lass, dialectal use in the York area

Lotsalatte

New Member
English (US)
Looking for synonyms to the word !lass" other than the obvious "girl", in the context of usage in northeastern England, especially the York area? How exactly is this word used, is it somewhat derogatory or is it more commonly used as a term of endearment, is it more commonly used in any certain population strata etc? Would appreciate any information on how the word "lass" is used in this particular region.
 
  • BLUE1308

    Senior Member
    Mazahua
    Is 'lass' understood in the whole English-speaking world as 'girl'? Or are there countries where it wouldn't be understood?
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    It has no other meaning, and I see no reason why any native English-speaker wouldn’t at least be aware of the word. But there are lots of different forms of English in different parts of the world, so who knows? ;)
     

    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    I associate the word with Scotland and to a lesser extent, England--I wasn't sure of which parts till I read the posts above, though I'd have guessed it was likely to be more common in the north, close to Scotland.
    Is 'lass' understood in the whole English-speaking world as 'girl'? Or are there countries where it wouldn't be understood?
    I doubt it's used in the US, at least not commonly.
     

    reno33

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    In the US, the term /lass/ would be understood only by what you might call "literary" types.....you know, people who read as a function of living or who have actually read books beyond the age of 12 or so. However, almost to a man (and woman) everyone would understand /Lassie/ a derivative, I imagine, of the UK's /lass/.
    Also in the US, /lass/ could be considered "dialectical" for /last/
     
    Last edited:
    < Previous | Next >
    Top