the one demands to be diverted, at least instructed

diait

Senior Member
italy/italian
Salve a tutti,
non riesco ad afferrare il senso di questa frase.
L'autore è il critico d'arte Horace Walpole.

From the antiquarian I expect greater thanks; he is more cheaply pleased than a common reader: the one demands to be diverted, at least instructed —- the other requires only to be informed”

(Dall'antiquario mi aspetto maggior riconoscenza perché è più facile da accontentare rispetto al lettore comune: l'uno chiede solo di essere intrattenuto o almeno istruito, l'altro solo di essere informato.)

ma se il critico fa meno fatica ad accontentare l'antriquario, perché l'antiquario gli dovrebbe maggior riconoscenza?
Forse mi sto confondendo.
grazie a tutti,
d
 
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  • rrose17

    Senior Member
    Canada, English
    A little convoluted, in my opinion. But after rereading a few times I'd say the critic Mr. Walpole is being self-deprecating and wondering why he has not received more praise from the antiquarians (the experts?) among his readers. He's saying that it's possible his writing is not all that entertaining or even very instructional, but it is at least informative which should please the antiquarians.
     

    diait

    Senior Member
    italy/italian
    hi rose, thank you so much for your comment,

    Just a few more doubts:
    a)
    who is the one who only requires to be informed, in your opinion: the antiquarian or the common reader?
    b)
    Should I read: "From the antiquarian I would expect greater thanks"?
    c)
    so the antiquarian is more inclined to be grateful, because he is easily please (easy to please)?
     

    rrose17

    Senior Member
    Canada, English
    a) who is the one who only requires to be informed, in your opinion: the antiquarian :tick: or the common reader?
    b) Should I read: "From the antiquarian I would expect greater thanks"? :tick:
    c) so the antiquarian is more inclined to be grateful, because he is easy to please?
    No, but the writer is saying they should be.
    The writer is being tongue-in-cheek. He's making fun of the antiquarians and poking fun a little at the "common" reader.
    In today's English it would sound something like
    C'mon guys! I've written a very informative book, where's the love? Ok so it's not a viral sensation but it's still good.
     
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