The opposite of postpone? [prepone?]

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AmericanAbroad

Member
American English
Well, as we Americans would say, whadda ya know?! The Cambridge English Dictionary, surely a British publication, lists the use of "advance" to talk about what we could call "moving up" the time of a meeting.
Here:
"to change the date or time of an event to an earlier one:
No plans were made to advance the board meeting."
advance
So, I will remain surprised if a British person proves unfamiliar with this usage, although given the state of general education today there may well be British people who are unfamiliar with the Cambridge English Dictionary (and some Oxford stalwarts who prefer the OED...). And I still think it would be more precise to talk about advancing the TIME or DATE of a meeting, not the meeting itself... :)
 
  • Roxxxannne

    Senior Member
    American English (New England and NYC)
    I amend my statement above: for me, 'advance' does not get around that ambiguity.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    The Cambridge English Dictionary does not claim to be a dictionary solely of British English. The OED also has, among its very many meanings of "advance", "to bring forward in time", but the only recent citations (1968 and 2004) are of North Americans. Neither those or the older ones refer to meetings.

    Your surprise remains strange - the BE speakers who have commented have made it clear that they do not advance their meetings.
     

    AmericanAbroad

    Member
    American English
    The Cambridge English Dictionary does not claim to be a dictionary solely of British English. The OED also has, among its very many meanings of "advance", "to bring forward in time", but the only recent citations (1968 and 2004) are of North Americans. Neither those or the older ones refer to meetings.

    Your surprise remains strange - the BE speakers who have commented have made it clear that they do not advance their meetings.
    Pffffft. I encourage you to stick to commentary about linguistic usage, rather than meta-commentary about personal reactions! hahaha
     

    AmericanAbroad

    Member
    American English
    Andygc was simply, in your terms, commenting that "linguistic usage" differs between AE and BE.
    That's strange. I thought he was commenting about the state of being surprised! hahaha I'm also surprised to see this much meta-commentary on things other than usage. How many more times do you want to NOT comment on the topic? hahaha
     

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    It has become readily apparent that there is no one single word on which everyone is agreed as being a suitable antonym for "postpone". Furthermore, the thread has become marred by a degree of personal bickering which is neither useful nor helpful. I'm therefore now closing the thread and will leave members to decide for themselves which of the various alternatives put forward they feel is the most suitable for the use they have in mind. DonnyB - moderator.
     
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