The Optima opens up to reveal a full keyboard inside.

xunilxunil

Banned
Urdu
"
The Smart Phones has a standard telephone keypad and I find them really awkward to use when I am sending a message.
The Optima opens up to reveal a full keyboard inside. You can also scroll up and down by touching the screen.
I like the way Smart Phone automatically displays a calendar when you open it up though, that is a really useful function."
What does "open up" mean in both situation ?!
what does 'though' mean ?! Is it conjunction or adverb?!
Could you please give an equivalent meaning from following dictionary:
http://www.learnersdictionary.com/definition/open


Thanks
 
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  • suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    It could mean two different things. I do not know these devices, but the first sounds like opening two parts of something, like a book or a shell to reveal one half is a screen and the other is the key board.

    The other sounds more like using open up to mean turn it on, to show the first screen the smart phone displays.
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    Oh sorry, now I see it is part of the original quotation. That though has nothing to do with the opening up. That is a conversational trick when comparing two things.
     

    xunilxunil

    Banned
    Urdu
    You can classify it as an adverb.
    Thanks so much for your reply.
    According to the following meaning of 'though' in Longman Dictionary as an adverb:
    "though adverb
    spoken used after adding a fact, opinion, or question which seems surprising after what you have just said, or which makes what you have just said seem less true:
    Two heart attacks in a year. It hasn't stopped him smoking, though."

    But, in the following sentence there is no sign of comparing or contrasting or surprising two different situations
    "I like the way Smart Phone automatically displays a calendar when you open it up though, that is a really useful function."

     
    Last edited:

    EStjarn

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    But, in the following sentence there is no sign of comparing or contrasting or surprising two different situations
    You have to look further back in the text: The Smart Phones has a standard telephone keypad and I find them really awkward to use when I am sending a message.

    (Note the subject-verb agreement error.)
     

    xunilxunil

    Banned
    Urdu
    You have to look further back in the text: The Smart Phones has a standard telephone keypad and I find them really awkward to use when I am sending a message.

    (Note the subject-verb agreement error.)
    But the bold key phrases you've mentioned located in the first paragraph, and after 4 sentences we use 'though' . I don't think it is the usual way conjunction and conjunctive adverb used.
    We use them in two sentences separated by commas and we need to check the contrast between sentences after and before comma like:
    I prefer to go shopping, though it is rainy.


    "The Smart Phones has a standard telephone keypad and I find them really awkward to use when I am sending a message. The Optima opens up to reveal a full keyboard inside. You can also scroll up and down by touching the screen. I like the way Smart Phone automatically displays a calendar when you open it up though, that is a really useful function."
     
    Last edited:

    EStjarn

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    Your use of 'though' in 'though it is rainy' is not adverbial but conjunctional. In the topic sentence, as suze br says, 'though' is an adverb.

    It is true that there's quite a distance between the relevant statements, but that does not mean we can't refer back to the former by using 'though'. Here's one other example:

    I like the way the different characters are described in the novel. Each one stands out clearly in my mind. It's as though I knew them personally. I don't care much for the story, though. It's too depressing for my taste.
     

    xunilxunil

    Banned
    Urdu
    Your use of 'though' in 'though it is rainy' is not adverbial but conjunctional. In the topic sentence, as suze br says, 'though' is an adverb.

    It is true that there's quite a distance between the relevant statements, but that does not mean we can't refer back to the former by using 'though'. Here's one other example:

    I like the way the different characters are described in the novel. Each one stands out clearly in my mind. It's as though I knew them personally. I don't care much for the story, though. It's too depressing for my taste.
    Thanks so much. I got it.
     
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