the <order><sequence> of those websites

lufei_wen

New Member
chinese
When I want to know which one is first, second and third, can I said:
I want to know the order of those websites you opened.
I have check some dictionaries, some may say "order" more used with uncountable arrangement. Does that means "sequence" works better in this sentence?

Thank you in advance !
 
  • KHS

    Senior Member
    You're sentence is a little strange (do you mean, the order in which you opened the websites? or possibly the order in which it is best to open the websites?).

    I'm not sure if either can be used with non-count concepts - do you have an example?

    For me, "order" indicates what happened first, second, third. "Sequence" can mean that, but "sequence" often means a closed group, such as "a three-course sequence" (in that expression, you simply couldn't use "order").

    I have a feeling I am overlooking many possibilities here, so hope other members will join in.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    It would be clearer to say "I want to know the order in which you opened those websites."
    :thumbsup: It links "order" with the verb "open". In the OP, "the order of those websites" might be their popularity, size or some other property other than "the order in which they were opened.

    In such a structure as the above, "sequence" would also work.
     

    lufei_wen

    New Member
    chinese
    You're sentence is a little strange (do you mean, the order in which you opened the websites? or possibly the order in which it is best to open the websites?).

    I'm not sure if either can be used with non-count concepts - do you have an example?

    For me, "order" indicates what happened first, second, third. "Sequence" can mean that, but "sequence" often means a closed group, such as "a three-course sequence" (in that expression, you simply couldn't use "order").

    I have a feeling I am overlooking many possibilities here, so hope other members will join in.
    Thank your for your correction. I found the usage of "order" on the website "wikidiff" said :
    As nouns the difference between sequence and order is that sequence is a set of things next to each other in a set order; a series while order is (uncountable) arrangement, disposition, sequence.
    A example
    The house is in order'
    Another question about the example "three courses sequence ", does it means three continuous courses and have to take them in order?
     

    lufei_wen

    New Member
    chinese
    :thumbsup: It links "order" with the verb "open". In the OP, "the order of those websites" might be their popularity, size or some other property other than "the order in which they were opened.

    In such a structure as the above, "sequence" would also work.
    Thank you, it makes sense. If I just want to express the sequence of something, for instance books or something, can I simply say "the order of books"?
     
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