the origins of and stimuli that give rise to a behavior

NewAmerica

Banned
Mandarin
Does "the origins of and stimuli that give rise to a behavior" mean "the origins of (a behavior) and stimuli that give rise to a behavior"?

The problem is that removing "of" appears working as well:

the origins of and stimuli that give rise to a behavior...

Thanks in advance

************************
It is not known why powerful impressions of personality traits, such as “crazy” or “insane,” arise. Conceivably, when the origins of and stimuli that give rise to a behavior are remote or unknown, or when the behavior strikes us as immutable, trait labels regarding the behavior arise.

—David L. Rosenhan

Source
 
  • Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Does "the origins of and stimuli that give rise to a behavior" mean "the origins of (a behavior) and stimuli that give rise to a behavior"?
    Yes.
    The problem is that removing "of" appears working as well:

    the origins of and stimuli that give rise to a behavior...
    No ... we wouldn't talking about the "origins that give rise to a behavior." An origin is simply a starting point, not a cause of anything.
     
    Last edited:

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    Please email David L. Rosenhan two commas:

    Conceivably, when the origins of, and stimuli that give rise to, a behavior are remote or unknown,

    Does that help?
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top