The owl hoots.

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Encolpius

Senior Member
Hungarian
Good morning ladies & gentlemen, how would you translate the sentence "the owl hoots" into other languages? Thank you in advance and have a productive day.

Hungarian: A bagoly huhog. (well, we use -h- too) :)
 
  • Greek:

    «Η κουκουβάγια χουχουτίζει» [i ku.kuˈva.ʝa xu.xuˈti.zi] --> the owl hoots

    -MoGr fem. noun «κουκουβάγια» [ku.kuˈva.ʝa] --> owl, onomatopoeia from the bird's hoot for the ancient Greeks «κικκαβαῦ» kĭkkabaû.

    -MoGr v. «χουχουτίζω» [xu.xuˈti.zɔ] (onomatopoeia) --> to hoot.
     

    nimak

    Senior Member
    Macedonian
    In Macedonian the Strix is known as ут (ut) m., утка (útka) f., and the Bubo Bubo is known as був (buv) m.

    The most common is to say: утот ука (útot úka), and бувот ука (búvot úka).
    Other words used are: утот ута (útot úta), and бувот бува (búvot búva).
     
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    nimak

    Senior Member
    Macedonian
    That's funny because утка is a duck in Russian. :)
    Interesting!
    In Macedonian утки (útki) pl. is actually the family name for all species of owl. Thus, the був (buv) is утка too, and several species of owl have "buv" in their name. Other species names are: ќук (ḱuk), кукувија (kukúvija), кукумјавка (kukúmjavka), улулајка (ulúlajka) etc.


    p.s. duck = пајка (pájka), патка (pátka), шатка (šátka)
     
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    Sowka

    Forera und Moderatorin
    German, Northern Germany
    I don't think there is a special term for this in German. I would say:

    Die Eule schreit. ("schreien" is a general verb for "call, scream, shout")

    We do have the verb "heulen", but this is used for wolves, not for owls. Unfortunately, because "die Eule heult" would be rather nice. ;)

    Edit: I have to correct myself. There are instances of "das Heulen der Eulen", even on a scientific website.

    Die Eule heult.

    I look at the sentence, well, OK, OK -- but I still think that "die Eule schreit" is more common. :)
     
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    Welsh_Sion

    Senior Member
    Welsh - Northern
    Welsh

    Not very impressive, I'm afraid but ....

    Mae'r (d)dylluan yn hwtio/hwtian

    Is DEF ART SM owl PRED hooting
    The owl hoots/The owl is hooting

    However, (d)ylluan (n.f.) is an interesting word in that it's a rarity in (possibly) suffering Soft Mutation (SM) twice - something no 'normal' word would (or should) do. This means, the original form was tylluan which if lenited become dylluan, /t/ > /d/ But, ove time, people I guess took dylluan to be the 'original' form and so lenited it further when appropriate, /d/ > /ð/.

    Another oddity perhaps is that Celts think of owls as 'death birds', predicting or announcing death - there is no idea of 'wise' owls in our mythology, just destruction and Death.

    Finally, a little off topic, I give you a palindromic story (a conversation between two owls who are courting) written by Kiwi, Jeff Grant. They are squabbling and mishearing each other. (The battle of the sexes - what else is new?!)

    "Too hot to hoot."
    "Too hot to woo!"
    "Too wot?"
    "Too hot to hoot!"
    "To woo!"
    "Too wot?"
    "Too hoot! Too hot to hoot!"
     

    ain'ttranslationfun?

    Senior Member
    US English
    L'hibou hulule, in French. In French, as in Italian, English, and other languages (as noted) there are different nouns for different types of owl; hibou is the generic term.) P. S., the /h/ is silent.
     
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    DearPrudence

    Dépêche Mod (AL mod)
    IdF
    French (lower Normandy)
    L'hibou hulule, in French. In French, as in Italian, English, and other languages (as noted) there are different nouns for different types of owl; hibou is the generic term.) P. S., the /h/ is silent.
    I can't agree with this.
    The /h/ is definitely not silent:
    > "Le hibou (h)ulule".
    If the owl has no egrets, then, it will be "une chouette". I don't think "hibou" is the generic term.
     

    ain'ttranslationfun?

    Senior Member
    US English
    I can't agree with this.
    The /h/ is definitely not silent:
    > "Le hibou (h)ulule".
    If the owl has no egrets, then, it will be "une chouette". I don't think "hibou" is the generic term.
    Yes, I meant the /h/ in 'hululer', sorry I wasn't specific enough. (What's an egret, apart from a non-owl type of bird, please*?)
    Une chouette - una civetta (IT), Tyto alba, a barn owl in English. In all language, ornitholigical taxonomy has different names of owl have specific equivalent nales in eveyday langage (barn owl, screech owl, eagle owl, great horned owl, snowy owl, etc.

    *I've just checked R&C, the source for WR; it gives 'chouette' f; (with ear tufts) hibou m. So I guess a) that since chouette is given first, it's more common [trust natives, ain'tt!] and b) 'egrets' are ear tufts (I've learned a new word today, although I can't imagine when I'd be likely to use it...) Mais c'est hibou chouette, quand même!
     
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    Welsh_Sion

    Senior Member
    Welsh - Northern
    What about "gwdihŵ" (pron. goodihoo)? Is that a different kind of owl?
    I remember this word from my Welsh-English dictionary. I like how it sounds, it's so onomatopoeic. :)
    Good find, @AndrasBP - I'd forgotten about that. It's odd to have a stressed vowel in the ultimate syllable in Welsh - guess it must be the onomatopeia!

    My excuse? Well, in part, it's more often with Southern Welsh (I'm a Northerner and these things are important, even in small languages like mine.) Otherwise, I'd also argue it's more a child's word for the bird, too.
     
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