"The pan is too small to drive up a slope powerfully..."

< Previous | Next >

NewAmerica

Banned
Mandarin
As I was pedaling a brand-new beautiful shared bike this noon, I found that, though comfortable to ride it on streets, it was a bit hard to drive it up a slope. So I thought:"The pan is too small to drive it up a slope powerfully."

By "the pan", I meant "the chain wheel" or "the crank set" of the bike.

The question of the thread is: Do you native speakers understand me if you were riding a bike with me when I spoke the pan? Or whether I've used the word "pan" correctly here?


Source: Impromptu English speaking practice by me.
 
  • Glenfarclas

    Senior Member
    English (American)
    No; also, the sentence is badly constructed in that it makes it sound like you were trying to ride the "pan," not the bicycle, up the slope.

    Also, we don't "drive a bicycle."
     

    Language Hound

    Senior Member
    American English
    I have no idea what a "pan" is on a bike.
    You might want to take a look at this bike diagram and list of bike parts here.
    Your revised sentence still does not work because "it" refers to pan ===>You can't bike the pan easily up a slope.:confused:

    P.S. What do you mean by a "shared" bike? A tandem? A bike that you and another person own? Something else?
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    I take it that you are talking about a tandem ("shared bike"?). Where did you find the word "pan" referring to bicycles? It may be jargon among keen cyclists, but I've been riding a bike for more than 60 years and all that time have thought a pan was used for cooking or for separating gold from gravel. :)

    If there's no gears you need to make the chain wheel smaller to increase the power at the wheel.
     

    NewAmerica

    Banned
    Mandarin
    I have no idea what a "pan" is on a bike.
    You might want to take a look at this bike diagram and list of bike parts here.
    Your revised sentence still does not work because "it" refers to pan ===>You can't bike the pan easily up a slope.:confused:

    P.S. What do you mean by a "shared" bike? A tandem? A bike that you and another person own? Something else?
    It is called chain rings in your link? Click Here to take a look at "the pan."

    Regarding "shared bike", it is a product of new economy: What's your opinion about Chinese shared dockless bikes such as Mobike and Ofo? Link: https://www.quora.com/Whats-your-opinion-about-Chinese-shared-dockless-bikes-such-as-Mobike-and-Ofo
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    It is called chain rings in your link? Click Here to take a look at "the pan."
    Slane Cycles (the site you linked to) does not call that a "pan". It calls it a "crankset". I've heard of cranksets. Chain rings bolt onto cranksets to provide chain-wheel gearing.

    Ah - that sort of "shared bike". That term isn't in general use in BE - public bike hire schemes, on-street cycle hire schemes etc.

    "The gearing is a bit high - it's hard to ride uphill."
     

    Language Hound

    Senior Member
    American English
    Yes, it appears to be a chainring.
    If you want to be really specific, I guess you could say that the small large chainring makes it hard to ride uphill.
    I would probably just say that it's hard to ride uphill on that bike.

    Cross-posted with Andygc.

    The crankset pictured on this Wikipedia page looks quite similar to your image.
    The crankset (in the US) or chainset (in the UK)...consists of one or more sprockets, also called chainrings[1][2][3] or chainwheels[3] attached to the cranks, arms,[4] or crankarms[5] to which the pedals attach.
     
    Last edited:

    RedwoodGrove

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    A small front gear on the pedal plus a large back gear on the wheel make the bicycle easier to pedal. The reverse makes it harder. I've never heard of a gear being called a "pan" but it isn't hard to imagine.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top