The paradisal promise "thou shalt have men to talk to"

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longxianchen

Senior Member
chinese
Hi'
The folloing words are from Lady Chatterley's Lover(para. 15):
"The amazing, the profound, the unbelievable thrill there was in passionately talking to some really clever young man by the hour, resuming day after day for months...this they had never realised till it(by the way, what doe "it" refer to please) happened! The paradisal promise: Thou shalt have men to talk to!--had never been uttered. It was fulfilled before they knew what a promise it was."

The word "this" is likely to refer to the preceding sentence "The amazing, the profound, the unbelievable thrill there was in passionately talking to some really clever young man by the hour, resuming day after day for months". And it is also likely to refer to the words behind itself,"The paradisal promise: Thou shalt have men to talk to!--had never been uttered. It was fulfilled before they knew what a promise it was."

I'm not sure which part it refers to. Would you PLEASE tell me about it?

Thank you in advance
 
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  • Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    You have guessed correctly, but it's made confusing by Lawrence's word-order. Put more simply:

    "The amazing, the profound, the unbelievable thrill there was in passionately talking to some really clever young man by the hour, resuming day after day for months...they had never realised this fact, till the event happened!"
     

    longxianchen

    Senior Member
    chinese
    Thank you. But what even happened? the fact "The amazing, the profound, the unbelievable thrill there was in passionately talking to some really clever young man by the hour, resuming day after day for months..."?
     

    se16teddy

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Talking to a clever young man over and over again is thrilling.

    Sometimes you anticipate a pleasure or thrill, but in this case they didn't ever hope for this thrill: they were unaware that it might come to them. Whereas virgins (constantly!) dream and wonder about what sex might be like, people who do not know this other thrill have never even heard about it.
     

    longxianchen

    Senior Member
    chinese
    I just want to know whether there is a rule when "this" or "that" is used to refer to something(a rule about refering something before it or behind it). Here is another example:
    "But a woman could yield to a man without yielding her inner, free self. That the poets and talkers about sex did not seem to have taken sufficiently into account. A woman could take a man without really giving herself away. "

    I also don't know which sentece "that" refer to(the sentence before "that" or behind "that"?). According to your explanation, can I say "that/this always reters to the words before them" in the similar case?
     
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    longxianchen

    Senior Member
    chinese
    << Moderator's note: This thread has been added to a previous discussion of the same sentence. >>

    Hi
    Here are some words from Lady Chatterley's Lover(para.16):http://www.putclub.com/book/1/23-672-di01zhang.html
    "The amazing, the profound, the unbelievable thrill there was in passionately talking to some really clever young man by the hour, resuming day after day for months...this they had never realized till it happened! The paradisal promise: Thou shalt have men to talk to!---had never been uttered. It was fulfilled before they knew what a promise it was."

    Please notice "the paradisal promise:Thou shalt have men to talk to!---had never been uttered." I think this sentence has nothing to do with the plot and context. Why did the author suddenly insert this sentence? And what does this sentence mean please?

    Thank you in advance.
     
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    Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    What does it mean? - Nobody had ever promised that they would have men to talk to - that promise would have been heavenly!
    Why did the author suddenly insert this sentence? - This is D.H. Lawrence, after all. He's always repeating himself, and here he's repeating the idea of the previous sentence, in different words. It does get a little wearing after a while.
     

    se16teddy

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Didn't we discuss a very similar passage from Lady Chatterley's Lover recently? It was about how women suddenly become aware of the pleasure of conversation with intelligent men when they experience it; whereas they eagerly anticipate the pleasure of sex? I can't find that thread though.

    The sentence "The paradisal promise: Thou shalt have men to talk to!---had never been uttered" similarly means that women do not anticipate of this pleasure, as they might anticipate the pleasure of a heavenly afterlife. It fits perfectly in the context, though (as Keith Bradford says) it might not move us on very far from the previous idea.
     
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    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    Moderator's note:
    I have added this discussion to the previous thread. :)

    Please scroll up and read from the top.
     
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