[The parents of A and B] vs [A and B's parents]

Discussion in 'English Only' started by TrungstXVI, Oct 12, 2017.

  1. TrungstXVI

    TrungstXVI Senior Member

    Vietnam
    What is the difference between the phrase "The parents of A and B" and the phrase "A and B's parents"? Or, are they the same?

    Thank you!
     
  2. heypresto

    heypresto Senior Member

    South East England
    English - England
    Can you please give us the complete sentence you have in mind, together with some context.
     
  3. TrungstXVI

    TrungstXVI Senior Member

    Vietnam
    For example, "The tin-roofed cabin near Lake Nicotoon was iconic: It was built by the parents of Tom and Archie when they first moved to Florida in 1938."
    Is the bolded sentence differ from "The tin-roofed cabin near Lake Nicotoon was iconic: It was built Tom and Archie's parents when they first moved to Florida in 1938"?
     
  4. dojibear

    dojibear Senior Member

    Fresno CA
    English - Northeast US
    In almost all situations, the "of" form and the apostrophe (') form have the same meaning. Both syntaxes are used for the "genitive" concept in English, which means either owning, possessing, or being part of something.

    Archie's father (the father of Archie)
    the building's front door (the front door of the building)
     

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