The past simple or the present perfect with "recently" here?

Mar Rojo

Senior Member
British English
I've got a feeling that the past simple is more correct here. What do you think?

'This section is an excerpt from the book “Negotiating International Business - The Negotiator’s Reference Guide to 50 Countries Around the World” by Lothar Katz. It has been updated with inputs from readers and others, most recently in June 2008.'

Link: http://www.globalnegotiationresources.com/cou/Brazil.pdf
 
  • JamesM

    Senior Member
    I get the impression that it has been updated multiple times (from the "most recently" comment). Because of that the past perfect sounds better to me. In other words, the implied meaning I get is "It has been updated (multiple times) with inputs from readers and others, most recently in June 2008."
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    There were a series of updates; the most recent was in June of 2008. Would you use the simple past for a series of actions?

    I would say "it was [last] updated in June 2008", but "it has been updated several times, most recently in June 2008."

    Added: Cross-posted with James. I believe we agree.
     

    boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    Oh, good point James and Cagey. I don't know why I immediately decided they had in mind only the latest update in June 2008...
     

    Mar Rojo

    Senior Member
    British English
    So, based on your thinking it seems, if any ellipsis were replaced, it would say this:

    "It has been updated with inputs from readers and others, and it was updated most recently in June 2008."

    Am I right?
     

    Merrit

    Senior Member
    English
    One of the circumstances in which we use the Present Perfect (and one which is frequently overlooked in this type of thread) is that of a past action with a present consequence.

    For example, in selecting a movie to watch, we might say "I've seen that." to mean 'I saw it at some past time, so I don't want to see it again now.' Or when Grandma offers us another piece of pie we might say "I've had enough, thanks" to mean 'I already ate three slices - result : I have no space for a fourth slice."

    In this case the Present Perfect "It has been updated ... ... June 2008" is also justified by the implicit consequence "Therefore it is better than competing books."

    m
     

    Saurabh

    Senior Member
    English-British, Hindi
    I'd prefer:

    It has been updated with inputs from readers and others(from time to time)and (it) was updated most recently in June 2008."
     
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