The peak season is the season that most people go on holiday

xunilxunil

Banned
Urdu
Hello All,
which one is correct? Ans why?

The peak season is the season that most people go on holiday.
The peak season is the season when most people go on holiday.

Lost of thanks.
 
  • RocketScience

    Senior Member
    English - England
    It would be 'when'. My theory here is that when you refer to one specific time frame, you can use 'that' as a pronoun ('Wednesday was the day that I decided upon to get my hair cut.'). However, this is a habitual action/time frame, therefore you use 'when' as a conjunction ('It's usually Wednesday when I get my hair cut.') Someone else may be able to describe it more technically than me, but that's the general idea.
     
    Last edited:

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    What do you think the difference is between "I will give you an answer that you like." and "I will give you an answer when you like."?
     

    Cenzontle

    Senior Member
    English, U.S.
    "When" is better than "that".
    In both sentences, the words after "the season" form a relative clause, with the adjectival function of modifying "the season".
    Ask yourself what function "when" or "that" has within the relative clause.
    The relative adverb "when" corresponds to "at some time", modifying the verb phrase "go on holiday".
    The relative pronoun "that" normally corresponds to "something"—but I find no function for "something" in the relative clause.
    Make sense?
     

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    'That' can be used in such situations (i.e. replacing a wh-adverb) only with the most general words: the time that we went, the day that we went, the place that I was born, the reason that we did it; but not :cross:the season that we go, :cross:the town that I was born, :cross:the explanation that we did it. With anything other than the likes of 'time', 'place', 'reason' you need either a wh-word or a preposition.

    It's a little more fluid with time words, so 'day that' and 'night that' are possible; maybe some others, but 'season' doesn't sound right.
     

    MilkyBarKid

    Senior Member
    British English
    The peak tourist season is the season when/during which most people go on holiday. (Referring to 'season' as a period of time)

    1952 was the year that Queen Elizabeth became monarch. (She didn't take a year to become monarch. ''1952' and 'year' are seen as a single entity, a time marker, not a period of time.)
     

    xunilxunil

    Banned
    Urdu
    Hello All,
    Oh, I get really surprised by lots of helpful and informative reply. Thanks.

    Hello MikyBarkid,
    Could you please clarify more?!
    You meant," 1952 was the year when Queen Elizabeth became monarch." was wrong ?! Why?
     

    Cenzontle

    Senior Member
    English, U.S.
    Hi, xunil. I'm cross-posting with #5, #6, and #7.
    Sorry for the brevity of my answer, above: I was called away.
    I think some "time words" ("moment", "minute", "day", "year"—but "season" is not firmly in that category) are privileged to be represented in a relative clause simply by "that"
    with the implication of an unspoken preposition ("the moment at which", "the minute at which", "the day on which", "the year in which".
    (And the relative pronoun "that" must be replaced by "which" when the preposition is explicit.)
    Titles like "The Day the Music Died" (song) or "The Day the Earth Stood Still" (movie) show you that the privilege can go so far as to delete the relative pronoun.
    But "Summer is the season people go on holiday" sounds only marginally acceptable to me.

    Aside from time words, the same thing happens with some other nouns ("season" reminded me of "reason"):
    "The reason I called you is..." (colloquial)
    "The reason that I called you is..." (colloquial)
    "The reason for which I called you is..." (too formal)
    "The reason why I called you is..." (best for both speech and writing)
    I see that entangledbank (#5) adds "time" and "place" to this group, and I fully agree: "I remember the time (that) I heard you sing"; "This is the place (that) my car broke down".
    (Well, now I'm not so sure about my last sentence, with "place".)
     

    xunilxunil

    Banned
    Urdu
    Thanks so much . So if I use "the year when" instead of "the year that" it might be incorrect?!!
    And we use when for a period of time and that for a time marker?!
     

    Cenzontle

    Senior Member
    English, U.S.
    "The year when" is perfectly okay in my opinion.
    I also find nothing wrong with "the year when Queen Elizabeth became monarch"—but then, she's not my queen.:) (Possible BE/AE difference?)
     
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