"The perfect aim Huntress" or "The Huntress of the perfect aim" ?

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Aesclapia

Member
French - France
Hello everyone,

I'm trying to create a periphrasis (using multiple words to express one, i.e. "the City that never sleeps" for NY) to refer to Artemis. Artemis is the goddess of hunt in the Greek mythology, renown for her skills at archery. I have two ideas, but I wonder if both are grammatically accurate, and which one would be the most literary, the most "poetic" so to speak. I'm also open to suggestions but I'd really like to keep the "perfect aim" and the "huntress" ^^

1) The Huntress of the perfect aim
2) The perfect aim Huntress

Thank you in advance !

Aesclapia
 
  • Aesclapia

    Member
    French - France
    Ok, thank you ! Does it sound "pretty" to you ? Or would you have an idea for a different phrasing ?
     

    User With No Name

    Senior Member
    English (U.S.)
    Does it sound "pretty" to you ? Or would you have an idea for a different phrasing ?
    Yes, I find it poetic.

    I am not suggesting this as an alternative in this context, but I did want to add that in everyday language, the normal way to express this would be "the huntress with perfect aim." (Of course, "huntress" is not everyday language, either.)
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    I agree with UWNN that with would be better than of, but I would retain the, although it doesn't fit with the usual rules for definite articles. It just sounds more poetic.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Does it sound "pretty" to you ? Or would you have an idea for a different phrasing ?
    Actually, yes, I do like it. I wouldn’t change it. :)

    Some might say that the huntress of the perfect aim implies that she’s searching for the perfect aim. But that doesn’t really worry me. I read it as the huntress characterised by (= famous for having) a perfect aim.
     
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