The person below me likes watching foreign films.

Talib

Senior Member
English
I am trying to translate: The person below me likes watching foreign films.

"Below" refers to posts in an internet forum.

My translation attempt: الشخص تحتي يحب أن يشهد الأفلام الأجنبي

Any feedback would be appreciated.
 
  • ayed

    Senior Member
    Arabic(Saudi)
    I am trying to translate: The person below me likes watching foreign films.

    "Below" refers to posts in an internet forum.

    My translation attempt: الشخص الذي يليني/بعدي يحب أن يشهد الأفلام الأجنبية

    Any feedback would be appreciated.
    :thumbsup:
     

    Talib

    Senior Member
    English
    شكرًا جزيلًا يا صديقي

    I did not know أفلام was in the feminine gender.
     
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    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    I did not know أفلام was in the feminine gender.
    All broken plurals are.

    There's one more mistake that Ayed must not have noticed: it's يشاهد and not يشهد. You can also say يحب مشاهدة.
     

    Talib

    Senior Member
    English
    Silly of me to forget that.

    So يحب مشاهدة means, then: He likes watching (as in the act of watching).

    Just curious, is there a "native" equivalent for أفلام? Like شطيرة = sandwich, حاسوب = computer.
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    So يحب مشاهدة means, then: He likes watching (as in the act of watching).
    It's "He likes watching" literally, but it means exactly the same thing as يحب أن يشاهد. It doesn't mean that he likes it when other people watch movies, or anything like that.
    Just curious, is there a "native" equivalent for أفلام?
    Not that I know of.
     

    Josh_

    Senior Member
    U.S., English
    I believe one Arabic equivalent is صورة متحركة, which is most likely a calque of the English "moving picture," (or perhaps "motion picture") which of course was shortened to just "movie." But of course, like the English term "motion picture," that term is not used, except maybe in formal contexts.

    It is also interesting, Talib, that you mentioned the word شطيرة because if you switch around ط and the ر, remove the ة, you get شريط which means film, as in ribbon. You can then add the word سينمائي and you get the Arabic equivalent of "film" -- شريط سينمائي (literally, cinematic film/ribbon). However, the English word 'film' is almost exclusively used to mean movie, whereas the Arabic probably only refers to the ribbon itself.
     
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    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    To me, صور متحركة (plural) means "cartoons." I've never come across the singular form.

    Anyone who uses صورة متحكرة for "movie" runs the risk of being misunderstood. فيلم is a well-established borrowing, kind of like "alcohol" in English. :)
     

    ayed

    Senior Member
    Arabic(Saudi)
    Thank you, Josh.In the past, my parents would say :تعالوا تفرجوا على الصور المتحركة :Come on boys and watch the moving picture
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    It is also interesting, Talib, that you mentioned the word شطيرة because if you switch around ط and the ر, remove the ة, you get شريط which means film, as in ribbon. You can then add the word سينمائي and you get the Arabic equivalent of "film" -- شريط سينمائي (literally, cinematic film/ribbon). However, the English word 'film' is almost exclusively used to mean movie, whereas the Arabic probably only refers to the ribbon itself.
    To me, a شريط is a cassette, so it's not the movie itself.
    In the past, my parents would say :تعالوا تفرجوا على الصور المتحركة :Come on boys and watch the moving picture
    And they were referring to movies and not cartoons?
     

    Josh_

    Senior Member
    U.S., English
    To me, a شريط is a cassette, so it's not the movie itself. And they were referring to movies and not cartoons?
    Yes, it has that meaning in Egyptian as well. But where does that name come from? I mean, why is a cassette called a شريط in Arabic? The base meaning here is film (as in ribbon or tape) -- a long, thin piece of material (that is often wrapped around a spool). A cassette is nothing more than a magnetic strip that spools from one side of a cassette to the other as you watch a movie. Look up "شريط سينمائي" on Google images? You'll see what I mean.

    The word "tape" in English also has this meaning and is why a cassette is also known as a tape.

    I can't remember what it is, but there is a linguistic term for the idea of using a word that makes up only part of an object, but refers to the whole object. Such as saying "you got a nice set of wheels" when complimenting someone on their car (wheels being only a part of the entire car). Using tape or شريط to refer to the entire cassette is an example of this. But some of these terms take on a life of their own, as it were, and the idea that they make up only a part of something larger is lost.
     
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    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    Yes, of course. I just wanted to clarify that شريط does not mean "movie."

    The linguistic term is "synecdoche."
     

    Josh_

    Senior Member
    U.S., English
    Yes, of course. I just wanted to clarify that شريط does not mean "movie."
    Yes, of course.

    I think there are two ideas here. شريط, by itself, refers to a movie cassette, but the phrase "شريط سينمائي" seems to refer to the actual ribbon itself, from what I can tell by looking at Google images, or maybe it can refer to both ideas. Of course, in casual speech only شريط would be used to refer to a cassette.

    The linguistic term is "synecdoche."
    Thanks for reminding me.:)
     
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