the person who causes a traffic incident

tievoli

Senior Member
P.R.China
Hi, I need 2 words to express:1) the person who causes an traffic incident, and 2) the employer whom this person is working for.

Thanks in advance for your kindly assistance!
 
  • Tabac

    Senior Member
    U. S. - English
    tievoli said:
    Hi, I need 2 words to express:1) the person who causes an traffic incident,perpetrator (?) and 2) the employer boss (?)whom this person is working for.

    Thanks in advance for your kindly assistance!
    Ni hao.

    I'm not sure what you're looking for. Do the above suggestions help?
     

    GenJen54

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    In this case, much depends upon the context.

    Since we don't have much more, we cannot determine whether "boss" or "employer" will work better here. Either could be appropriate, depending upon the circumstance.

    I'm not sure perpetrator is exacly right, unless this were, for example, a hit and run, or drunk driving, accident, where the one who caused the accident actually committed a crime.

    Instigator might work, but its more frequent use is that of someone who deliberately stirs up or starts trouble.

    Without further context, it's hard to tell. Perhaps tievoli can provide us with a sentence or something that would help us find the appropriate word(s).
     

    rsweet

    Senior Member
    English, North America
    For the traffic accident, I would just say "the driver/person at fault" or "the driver who caused the accident." "Perpetrator" sounds like a much more serious crime!
     

    maxiogee

    Banned
    English
    Unless the guilt has been proven, I'd be slow to ascribe blame.
    Perpetrator does indeed sound dreadful in this instance.
    If guilt has indeed been proven (or if a court action is pending, then they are the plaintiff and the defendant).

    I'd like to know your relationship to either of the parties to the accident —> are you the lawyer, insurer, or in some other relationship with one of them?
    If so, then they are "our client" and "the other party", I would suggest.
    If you are a disinterested party - a witness or policeman or connected with a disinterested party then I'm not sure how best to phrase it. I'm averse to labelling them "party A" and "party B" but that might be best as you then avoid ascribing guilt/innocence as accidents regularly involve fault on the part of more than one party.
     

    GenJen54

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    I'm averse to labelling them "party A" and "party B" but that might be best as you then avoid ascribing guilt/innocence as accidents regularly involve fault on the part of more than one party.

    On police reports in the U.S., they are simply labelled as "Driver A," "Driver B," etc. However, once the insurance company becomes involved, then "Driver A" (usually the one who hits any other driver) becomes labelled as "driver at fault" as rsweet suggested.
     

    tievoli

    Senior Member
    P.R.China
    Ahh, so sorry for my late reply, for I just came back to the office. The ccontext should be like this: Someone was injured in a traffic accident, and then he negotiated with the (XXX, here is the word I need, may I use "the party at fault"?) for compensation. As for the (XXX, another word I need to express the driver caused the accident), he was also injured fatally in the accident.

    Hope the above can give you more hints. Thanks!
     

    maxiogee

    Banned
    English
    tievoli said:
    Ahh, so sorry for my late reply, for I just came back to the office. The context should be like this: Someone was injured in a traffic accident, and then he negotiated with the (XXX, here is the word I need, may I use "the employer of the party at fault"?) for compensation. As for the (XXX, another word I need to express the driver who caused the accident), he was also injured fatally in the accident.

    Hope the above can give you more hints. Thanks!

    If the "someone injured" was also driving at the time of the accident, then I'd use "other driver's employer" and "other driver".
    If the "someone injured" was a pedestrian or otherwise not driving, I'd use "driver's employer" and "driver".

    I take it that the negotiation was not with the person who (subsequently) died.
     
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