the pidgin speak of command and control

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farzaneh.N

Member
Persian - Iran
Hi! Please let me get what the bold sentence says:

Implicit in Rawnsley’s comments on the translation devices developed to date by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency is the notion that ‘blunt phrase exchanges’ and the spitting out of a few ‘key phrases and words’ do not constitute ‘complex communication’ or represent language use in the real world. Translation that is underpinned by a paradigm of purposive instrumentality is doomed to the pidgin speak of command and control. That translation should be seen in such terms is hardly surprising, as one of the most difficult myths around translation is what we might call the myth of translation transitivity. Transitivity here is used in the grammatical sense of a verb taking an object.

Thanks.
Reference: Translation in the Digital Age by Michael Cronin
 
  • se16teddy

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Natural languages can be used for any purpose. The translation devices currently in use only work on sub-sets of languages that are used (instrumentality) for particular narrow purposes (purposive). These sub-sets are like pidgins. (The word pidgin is in the dictionary.)

    It is an odd use of "doomed".
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    (Ironic that a piece of writing about translation should contain passages of such absolute incomprehensibility:cool:)
     

    farzaneh.N

    Member
    Persian - Iran
    T
    Natural languages can be used for any purpose. The translation devices currently in use only work on sub-sets of languages that are used (instrumentality) for particular narrow purposes (purposive). These sub-sets are like pidgins. (The word pidgin is in the dictionary.)

    It is an odd use of "doomed".
    Thanks for your help.
     
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