the plural verb in present simple

jnonsport

New Member
Arabic
hi

this is my second Q. :

She likes cooking and dancing

Is it correct , If we write sentence in present simple ?
 
  • Resa Reader

    Senior Member
    She likes cooking and dancing.

    Is it correct if we write the sentence in present simple ?
    The sentence is written in the present simple. / She likes cooking and dancing.

    I think you wanted to ask if you can use the infinitive instead of the gerund ('-ing form') after the verb 'like'.

    Yes, you can. So you can say 'She likes to cook and to dance.'

    I'd say, however, that the gerund is more common after 'like' and 'love' if you talk about activities that you always like.
     
    Last edited:

    jnonsport

    New Member
    Arabic
    I know it is in present simple

    I mean( She likes cooking and dancing )

    after (likes) this verb cooking , dancing

    we add -ing to verb after likes ( present simple )

    or we say ( she likes cook and dance ) ??

    which sentence is correct ?
     

    Fabulist

    Banned
    American English
    No, we (users of English who learned it as children as their first language) never say "She likes cook and dance."

    Even though she says her native language is German, Rosa Reader is correct: We do say and write "She likes to cook and dance" or "She likes to cook and to dance."

    The thread title is about "plural verb." English verbs aren't inflected for whether the subject is singular or plural. If you mean to ask whether the gerund or the infinitive should be used depending on whether there is one or more than one after a verb such as "like," the answer is, "No."

    She likes cooking.:tick:
    She likes cooking, baking, swimming, dancing, and partying.:tick:

    She likes to cook.:tick:
    She likes to cook, bake, swim, dance, and party.:tick:
    She likes to cook, to bake, to swim, to dance, and to party.:tick::confused: (Theoretically, this is OK, but most users of English would probably not repeat the "to" that often.)
     

    Resa Reader

    Senior Member
    She likes ... requires a noun to follow, not a verb and cooking and dancing are nouns.
    I'd say that the gerund (She likes cooking.) is more common here but the infinitive is not impossible and therefore also correct.
    (She likes to cook). (I think the infinitive with 'like', 'love' and 'hate' is more common in American than in British English here.)

    Note that 'to like to do something' could also mean 'to think it wise or right to do something'.

    She likes to prepare fresh meals for her children. (She thinks this is better than feeding them hamburgers.)
     
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    GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    English verbs aren't inflected for whether the subject is singular or plural.
    ???
    The forms of English verbs do change depending on whether the subject is singular or plural; one would say "She likes cooking and dancing", but "They like cooking and dancing."

    The form of the verb does not change, however, because of the number of the object.

    In any case, the sentence "She likes cooking and dancing" has a singular verb (and not a plural one) because the subject "she" is singular. The fact that she likes multiple things, and not just one thing, is irrelevant to what form the verb has.
     

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I know it is in present simple

    I mean( She likes cooking and dancing )

    after (likes) this verb cooking , dancing

    we add -ing to verb after likes ( present simple )

    or we say ( she likes cook and dance ) ??

    which sentence is correct ?
    I think this thread may help you, Jnonsport. I suspect that the issue of whether to use the gerund (cooking) or the infinitive (to cook) - we can say both she likes cooking and she likes to cook - is what you are asking about.

    This is a common question in the forum, and if the thread I gave you doesn't produce an answer of sorts, I strongly recommend you try some of the others.
     

    Fabulist

    Banned
    American English
    ???
    The forms of English verbs do change depending on whether the subject is singular or plural; one would say "She likes cooking and dancing", but "They like cooking and dancing."
    English verbs have a special form for the third person singular, present tense only. There is no general inflection of English verbs depending on whether the subject is singular or plural. In this, English verbs differ from those of many languages, which have a separate form within each tense for each combination of person and number. In the first and second person, the verb has the same form in the singular and plural. In all persons of the past, the verb has the same form in the singular and plural, although the past form differs from the present form through the suffixing of a dental stop (spelled, -ed, pronounced -ed, 'd, or 't, depending on the preceding sound).
     

    GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    English verbs have a special form for the third person singular, present tense only.
    Which is the tense that we were talking about...:)

    I would also note that while the second person singular (that is , "thou") is archaic, it is not completely extinct by any means, if only because it is still used by some in certain situations, such as prayer. There is also a special form for second person singular in both the present tense and the past tense (e.g., today thou sayest; yesterday thou saidst.) [/QUOTE]
     
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