The police officer seemed to be <suggesting> <hinting> that the death was not an accident.

loviii

Senior Member
russian
Greetings!

One of the definitions of the verb "suggest" from thefreedictionary.com:
to suggest - to express or say indirectly:
(1) The police officer seemed to be suggesting that the death was not an accident.

My remade sentence:
(2) The police officer seemed to be hinting that the death was not an accident.
Does (1) mean (2) and if not, then why?

Thanks!
 
  • kalamazoo

    Senior Member
    US, English
    I think they are different. A "hint" is more like a pointer to a particular fact. If the officer is 'hinting' it tends to imply that he already knows the death is not an accident. A "suggestion" is more like a possibility. If the officer is 'suggesting' it means that he is raising the possibility.
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Suggesting, hinting, and presuming all have different meanings. In general, if words differ, they have different meanings.
     

    loviii

    Senior Member
    russian
    Suggesting, hinting, and presuming all have different meanings. In general, if words differ, they have different meanings.
    I don't understand what word or, at least, words we can replace "suggest" in (1) with. Do you have any thoughts about it?

    Thanks!
     

    kalamazoo

    Senior Member
    US, English
    Why do you want to replace the word "suggest"? You could say the officer "alluded indirectly to the possibility that perhaps the death wasn't an accident." I am not sure that adds anything except more words though.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    I don't understand what word or, at least, words we can replace "suggest" in (1) with. Do you have any thoughts about it?
    Do you mean that you are trying to use other words to clarify the meaning for yourself, rather than just looking for a synonym? If so, the phrasing suggested by kalamazoo might have helped you. There is no single word that can replace "suggest" to provide an identical meaning.
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    I don't understand what word or, at least, words we can replace "suggest" in (1) with. Do you have any thoughts about it?
    Approximately:
    The police officer was behaving in a certain manner, making some indicative facial expressions, looking at certain things and/or people in a certain way, using certain tones or emphasising or using certain words, and all with a certain body language. All of which seemed to indicate to the people who saw and heard these things that the policeman believed, or at least thought, that the death was not an accident - although he never said this.
     
    Last edited:

    kuronin

    New Member
    English - Canadian
    Kalamazoo is right on track. I would have used the verb "to infer." The officer inferred through his actions (and/or behavior,) that a crime had been committed.
     

    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I would have used the verb "to infer." The officer inferred through his actions (and/or behavior,) that a crime had been committed.
    :thumbsdown: 'Infer' is the wrong word.

    The officer didn't infer anything through his actions or behaviour. Anybody seeing or listening to him might have inferred something through his actions or behaviour.
     
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