<the> political and economic <ones>

wuzongxian

Member
Chinese
A:
Have you ever seen EnglishDigest?
B:
1.Why are most of the articles in it political and economic ones?
2.Why are most of the articles in it political and economic?
3.Why are most of the articles in it the political and economic?


Some friend asked me to translate a sentence. In this dialogue the three sentences from B are what I'm trying to translate. As dear native speakers,which one do you think more authentic? Or you guys have better ones?Thanks a lot!
 
  • bwac14

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Number 3 is not correct. The first two are correct but I would probably say: "Why are most of the articles in it either political or economic?"
     

    Wordy McWordface

    Senior Member
    English - SSBE Standard British
    1: Not a natural use of "ones". We generally use "ones" to distinguish between sets of items (e.g. "I read the political articles but not the economic ones")

    2. Better than #1, but I prefer bwac14's version. You need the 'either' to make the point about the limited scope of most articles. You're complaining about the fact that there are hardly any other topics.

    3. Incorrect.

    I'd precede the comment with a response such as "Yes. But...". Otherwise, it's not an answer to the question.

    I'm also not convinced by the collocation 'economic articles'. The articles are about economics: they are not "economic" themselves. Economic pressures, economic growth... but 'economic articles'? I'd be interested to hear other people's opinions about whether this works.
     
    Last edited:

    wuzongxian

    Member
    Chinese
    Oh, It looks like we have a different academic definition.Ha,in Chinese,we usually combine politics and economics to a whole.Like knives and forks. You guys take these two as different parts.:D If we take political and economic articles as a whole, what do you guys say then? Thank you very much!:thank you:
     

    Roxxxannne

    Senior Member
    American English (New England and NYC)
    Let's substitute reduce 'political and economic' to one adjective and see what happens:
    1.Why are most of the articles in it economic ones?
    2.Why are most of the articles in it economic?
    3.Why are most of the articles in it the economic?

    1) This is the best of the three, but still not idiomatic English. I'm distinguishing the set of articles about economics from the larger set of all other articles in the magazine.
    2) I agree with W McW in post #3: "The articles are about economics: they are not 'economic' themselves."
    This version sounds strange.
    3) is still definitely incorrect.

    Another possibility (in addition to those in #2 and #4) is "Yes, but why are most of the articles in it about economics?"
     

    wuzongxian

    Member
    Chinese
    Let's substitute reduce 'political and economic' to one adjective and see what happens:
    1.Why are most of the articles in it economic ones?
    2.Why are most of the articles in it economic?
    3.Why are most of the articles in it the economic?

    1) This is the best of the three, but still not idiomatic English. I'm distinguishing the set of articles about economics from the larger set of all other articles in the magazine.
    2) I agree with W McW in post #3: "The articles are about economics: they are not 'economic' themselves."
    This version sounds strange.
    3) is still definitely incorrect.

    Another possibility (in addition to those in #2 and #4) is "Yes, but why are most of the articles in it about economics?"
    I considered "articles about economics". But I was not sure if economic articles and articles about economics have the same meaning. Now it looks "articles about economics" is the better one.
    Thank all of you guys! You're so kind.
     
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