the postmorten autopsy of deceased patients

NewAmerica

Banned
Mandarin
Background: The Chinese professor, Liu Liang, of anatomy has carried out the postmorten autopsy for 3 deceased Covid-19 patients. This job is the first in the world.

Reporter: Were you frightened when you were anatomizing the bodies of the coronavirus patients?
Professor: Yes, I was frightened, to be honest. If I say I was calm withour fear, it would be fake. Because the deeper you cut into the body, the higher concentraton of the virus released into the air. It is extremely dangerous because you are not sure whether aerosol transmission of the virus exists. If it does, I would be doomed.

Source: English writing practice by me.

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The question of this thread is whether the word "deceased" is redundant since it has already pointed out "postmortem autopsy."
 
  • lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    The word deceased doesn’t even occur in that rather oddly worded dialogue. And in the ‘Background’ statement, which also contains errors, it’s the word postmortem that’s redundant. An autopsy is a post-mortem (after-death) examination.
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    Well, they aren't patients after they have died, so you need some modifier. "Deceased" is a good choice. If you chose a different noun, such as "victims", then you would not need "deceased" or any other modifier.

    Note that it should be "the Chinese professor of anatomy, Liu Liang" or "Lui liang, the Chinese professor of anatomy".
     

    NewAmerica

    Banned
    Mandarin
    Thank you. :)

    If "deceased" is used, how to put it in the expression?

    autopsy for 3 deceased of Covid-19?

    It does not seem to work.
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    Thank you. :)

    If "deceased" is used, how to put it in the expression?

    autopsy for 3 deceased of Covid-19?

    It does not seem to work.
    "Deceased" as a noun is used to refer to a corpse as a person, and is usually used because you want to say something about the person from the time before they died. It is not used to refer a corpse, as such, and is inappropriate here.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    If "deceased" is used, how to put it in the expression?

    autopsy for 3 deceased of Covid-19?

    It does not seem to work.
    It doesn’t work. You die “of” something, you don’t decease of something! In this case, deceased is an adjective, describing someone who has very recently died, not the past participle of “decease” (there is no such verb in modern English). That is, it refers to someone who is deceased, not someone who has deceased.

    I wouldn’t have a problem with either of these statements:

    [he] conducted the autopsies of three deceased Covid-19 patients.
    [he] carried out post-mortems on three deceased Covid-19 patients.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    Well, they aren't patients after they have died
    I'd consider them to be patients until the undertaker collects the remains.
    I wouldn’t have a problem with either of these statements:

    [he] conducted the autopsies of three deceased Covid-19 patients.
    [he] carried out post-mortems on three deceased Covid-19 patients.
    Neither would I, but I wouldn't consider "deceased" necessary. If they aren't dead they're unlikely to cooperate with the procedure.
     

    NewAmerica

    Banned
    Mandarin
    I wouldn’t have a problem with either of these statements:

    [he] conducted the autopsies of three deceased Covid-19 patients.
    [he] carried out post-mortems on three deceased Covid-19 patients.
    Sounds natural to me.
    But Uncle Jack says "they aren't patients after they have died." He appears to object to the collocation of "deceased" and "patients." I am not sure.


    I'd consider them to be patients until the undertaker collects the remains.

    Neither would I, but I wouldn't consider "deceased" necessary. If they aren't dead they're unlikely to cooperate with the procedure.
    Thank you. :)
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I think that’s splitting hairs. ;) In a news report, for example, could you describe someone as “the deceased politician” or “the deceased businessman”, etc.? Yes.
     

    london calling

    Senior Member
    UK English
    The postmortem autopsy of deceased patients

    Good heavens. I sincerely hope they really were deceased. :eek:

    I agree with the above. 'Autopsy (of patients who died of...)' is really all that's necessary.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    The postmortem autopsy of deceased patients

    Good heavens. I sincerely hope they really were deceased. :eek:

    I agree with the above. 'Autopsy (of patients who died of...)' is really all that's necessary.
    Yes, that phrase struck me as overkill. We don't need to be told three times that the patient was dead.
     
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