the present المضارع for the imperative الأمر

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Qureshpor

Senior Member
Panjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
In the following sentences is the present indicative being used as akind of polite imperative?

1) wa kaifa anzilu? qaalaa, taq'udiina fii_ddalw...

How shall I come down? He said, "you will sit in the bucket..."

2) uriid an tadzhabii ilaa_ssuuqi fa-tashtarii lii Khubz-an wa baiD-an taD'iinuhaa fii sallat-in

I want you to go to the market and buy for me some bread and eggs which you will put in a basket.
 
  • Qureshpor

    Senior Member
    Panjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    Thank you. Understood!

    [EDIT]
    Would you say that "tanSiruuna" in

    fa-qaala Sulaimaan tanSiruuna wa naraa fiimaa bainanaa

    is also a suggestion?
     
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    Qureshpor

    Senior Member
    Panjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    Could someone please provide an English translation for the below sentence which I quoted in my opening post. Apologies in advance for not being able to type a hamza over the alif and two dots below the yaa.

    ارید ان تذھبی الی السوق فتشتری لی خبزا و بیضا تضعینھا فی سلۃ
     

    Qureshpor

    Senior Member
    Panjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    Luke, you did n't add anthing in the last post, as far as I can see.
    Thank you Luke. I am glad you are able to finish the post you started on 14/03/2011!:)

    What kind of sentence is this where you don't have a و before تضعینھا and we are using a مضارع with an imperative force?
    It should be ila_ssuuqi, not ilaa_ssuuqi, because the aa get shortened.
    Yes, I am aware. If this was written in the Arabic script, it would be written long as I have done but read short.
     
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    lukebeadgcf

    Senior Member
    English – US
    :)

    In the sentence you provided, I would interpret the phrase starting with تضعينها as being a relative clause referring back to the bread and eggs. So literally: "bread and eggs, which you put in a basket."

    Or perhaps as Rayloom suggested, it's simply a polite way to convey an imperative meaning, but I still tend to read it the first way.
     

    Qureshpor

    Senior Member
    Panjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    In the sentence you provided, I would interpret the phrase starting with تضعينها as being a relative clause referring back to the bread and eggs. So literally: "bread and eggs, which you put in a basket."
    Thank you, this is how I am interpreting it. However, an idiomatic translation that you have provided hints at a kind of polite imperative. Would you agree or is there another name for it?
     

    Qureshpor

    Senior Member
    Panjabi, Urdu پنجابی، اردو
    Thank you Luke. I think we can wrap up this thread now. Another satisfied customer, as the saying goes:)
     
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