the pressure range for water <being?> in each one of the three phases

hhtt

Senior Member
Turkish
What's if we ignore "being" in the sentence "Give the approximate pressure range in kPa for water being in each one of the three phases,vapor,liquid or solid." ?
What is the role of "being" in that sentence what do we call it?
 
  • Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    The page to which you link doesn't say anything about "being".
    What you quote in #1 looks like a test question. Does the textbook you cite really contain a test-question section, or does your question just appear in a test that's part of a course that happens to use your book as its main textbook?

    The sentence would almost work if you changed "being" to "to be", but really I'd have expected it to be more like "Give the ... pressure ranges ... in (or over) which water exists in each of the three phases ..." (ranges plural, and without one after each).
     

    hhtt

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    The same question arises here:"Work is usually defined as a force F acting through a displacement x, the displacement being in the direction of the force."
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    No, this one is perfectly OK, "the displacement being" in this case means "where it is understood that the displacement is".
    That construction doesn't really work with the water phases example.
     

    hhtt

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    No, this one is perfectly OK, "the displacement being" in this case means "where it is understood that the displacement is".
    That construction doesn't really work with the water phases example.
    Did you look at the second link I gave? It is a famous book and writer are professors from the States so are you sure that the first one is wrong? Might it be a difference due to different accent and can you or moderator explain why the first one is wrong?
     
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    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    Yes, I looked. It just confirms that your quote in #1 was accurate (except that you changed lbf/in2 into kPa). The added context of the previous sentence makes it appear slightly less wrong. They are talking about one particular temperature, and are interested in the pressures at which water at that temperature will be in each of the phases. But being still looks strange here.

    There is another oddity in the extract. I would have used and instead of or in the list of phases.

    Perhaps the learned professors got their foreign grad students to write their test questions for them, and then they weren't proof-read properly. ;)
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    No, they are not interchangeable. Of your three examples, the first two mean different things and the third has no meaning, being simply incorrect.
     

    hhtt

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    No, they are not interchangeable. Of your three examples, the first two mean different things and the third has no meaning, being simply incorrect.
    Then can you explain please what is the difference between the first two and why the third one is incorrect?
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    Well, this risks drifting off-topic, but when you work to be a teacher (which is not actually very good English), it would be likely to mean that you are studying to become a teacher;
    when you work as a teacher, it means you are a teacher, and working in that capacity.
    I can't really think of any context in which the third one would be meaningful.
     

    George French

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    What's if we ignore "being" in the sentence "Give the approximate pressure range in kPa for water being in each one of the three phases,vapor,liquid or solid." ?
    What is the role of "being" in that sentence what do we call it?
    Now I am quite happy with this use of being, it is out there in many an erudite tome.. (search on:- "water being in each one ").
    Mind you that was the sort of stuff I once had to read and understand... so I consider it to be a normal way of expressing this..

    GF..

    Gerund.....
    And note that there seems to be many a 1:1 copy of the text.... out there...
     
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