The price of knowledge is to spread it

Pan-Eslavo Brasil

Member
Portuguese - Brazil
Salve, amici! Ut valetis?

I'd want to ask you which do you think is the best translation for the sentence "The price of knowledge is to spread it" (in Portuguese, "O preço pelo conhecimento é transmiti-lo"). I've thought on "Scientiae pretium diffusio eius est", in one of the possible word orders. Would you have other suggestions? For instance, "Diffundere scientiam est eius pretium", or "propago/propagatio" instead "diffundo/diffusio"?

Gratias vobis ago!!!
 
Last edited:
  • Snodv

    Senior Member
    English - Mid-Southern US
    Salve Pan-Eslavo! (BTW, your "hello" to us should be plural salvete)
    Diffundere
    and propagare seem to have nearly identical extended meanings, but I personally prefer propagare (with its noun propagatio) for its connection to planting and growing. Pretium scientiae est propagatio [eius]. Others, of course, may have different ideas, and even more compelling reasons for them.
     

    Pan-Eslavo Brasil

    Member
    Portuguese - Brazil
    Thank you very much! Only today I was able to read your answer, hehehe. Yes, you're right, salvete is plural... I'm lacking practice, so many years without using Latin 🙈
     

    Sobakus

    Senior Member
    Can you quote Latin examples of the use of an interrogative ''ut''? Apparently, it wasn't that common - instead of ''quomodo''.
    ''Valeo'' usually means ''I'm well/I'm in good health'' , therefore (in my view) a sensible question would perhaps be An valetis? = Are you (all) well?
    PHI is the corpus of choice for this kind of queries. ut valēs? is not really about choosing to be sensible any more than "how are you?" in English, it's the default greeting formula in its corresponding language. quōmodo valēs? does pop up here and there in Late/Medieval Latin (search for "quomodo vales" with quotes), but as far as I can tell it wasn't idiomatic in classical and would be interpreted as "in what way are you well?", "how is it possible? you can't be well!". an introduces the alternative answer, so an valēs? is something like a surprised "so you're well, are you/or what?" (Russian что ли) when it doesn't mean "or are you well?".

    I must say that although this is not the first time I see people taken by surprise by such a fundamental Latin word/expression (the first time was on an epigraphy researcher's blog), and although I'm perfectly aware of the reasons why (the almost total absence of conversational or oral instruction in most recent curricula), this still strikes me as something quite unique in foreign languages. Please don't take this as me being mean :)
     
    Last edited:

    Scholiast

    Senior Member
    saluete amici!

    Unsurprisingly, the OLD entry for ut is vast, running to eleven (finely printed) columns, in five principal sections, and 44 sub-sections, amounting to about 33 column-cm in all. Noting that the passages Sobakus cites (in # 7) from PHI are mostly from Plautus and Terence, I would add that OLD (under A § 1) has—for this sense of the word and usage—references to (among others) Cicero (Cluent. and ad Att.), Livy, Tibullus, Propertius and Horace.
    That's good enough for me!:)

    Σ
     
    Last edited:
    Top