the pronunciation of "mustn't, firstly, secondly ..."

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Dingdongdong

Senior Member
Bân-lâm-gú /Chinese China
Hi, I just want to know:
What's the pronunciation of "mustn't, firstly, secondly ", ['mʌsnt]['fɜːslɪ]['sekənlɪ]? If there's such a structure: consonant+consonant+consonant in a single word, should the second consonant be omitted when we pronouce it ?

Thanks.
 
  • Linkway

    Senior Member
    British English
    Hi, I just want to know:
    What's the pronunciation of "mustn't, firstly, secondly ", ['mʌsnt]['fɜːslɪ]['sekənlɪ]? If there's such a structure: consonant+consonant+consonant in a single word, should the second consonant be omitted when we pronouce it ?

    Thanks.
    Fot pronunciation, the WR or other English dictionary will guide you.

    The issue is not about three consecutive consonants, but the pronunciation of t and d, which varies a lot in different words and varities of English.
     

    long619

    Senior Member
    Northern Vietnamese
    As a English learner, just like you, I recommend you not to omitt any "sound" when you're speaking english. And to me, these "sounds" are not hard, you can say them properly without omitting any sounds.
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    In mustn't we don't pronounce the first 't' because 'tnt' is almost impossible to enunciate properly.
    In firstly and secondly there is no such problem, and we do pronounce the 't' and 'd'.

    There is no such simple rule as always skipping the second of three consonants. If there were, why (in 'firstly') would you omit the 't' in 'stl' and not the 's' in 'rst'? Some of us do pronounce the 'r', and those of us who do pronounce all four consonants.

    Firstly and secondly are poor examples because these words are formed by adding 'ly' to existing words first and and second, and we pronounce the 'first' in firstly the same as we do in first and then just add the 'ly' sound.

    We often do omit the 't' in words such as bustle and bristle, but this has much to do with the silent 'e' at the end.
    There are also oddities like subtle, where we pronounce the 't' but not the 'b'.
     

    long619

    Senior Member
    Northern Vietnamese
    Your problem is 3 final sounds right
    All you have to do is pronounce them particularly and then merge them all together
    For example:

    Firstly /ˈf3ːstlɪ/ : so you'll pronouce "ly" first, and then "tly" and then pronounce the whole word "firstly"

    That's how I paractised
     

    Linkway

    Senior Member
    British English
    Depending on various contextual factors, if I heard someone say secondly with no 'd', I would associate it with being less educated or attempting (sic) to be very casual.

    'Absurdly' said without 'd' would be just plain wrong in all or most varieties of English.

    In 'inspect' for example the pronunciation of the 's' is essential.
     

    long619

    Senior Member
    Northern Vietnamese
    You have to make your tongue familiar with english sounds first, then you can do whatever you want. There are a lot of words, phrase which are very hard to pronounce, you cant pronounce them properly if your mind is full of "impossible" thoughts.
     

    Dingdongdong

    Senior Member
    Bân-lâm-gú /Chinese China
    As a non-native speaker, I have to say -- It's not easy for me to master a foreign language in my country. After ten years, about 2,200hrs of English learning from junior school to university, I've spent another 1500hrs during working period. However, it is far, far from enough. I know it has a beginning but no end. Maybe it would cost one more ten year untill I can use it with skill.

    Thank you for your replies. I'll practise more.
     
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