The proof of the pudding is in the eating

Hoi!

How can I translate The proof of the pudding is in the eating in Dutch?

The context is an invitation to try a wonderful experience.


Thank you very much!

Luna
 
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  • Greetd

    Member
    Dutch - Belgium
    I don't agree, that saying has a different meaning (it's more like "practise makes perfect"). I don't know if there's a Dutch equivalent for this saying, I don't think so, but if there is I'm afraid I don't know it :)
     

    jacquesvd

    Senior Member
    Dutch
    I don't agree, that saying has a different meaning (it's more like "practise makes perfect"). I don't know if there's a Dutch equivalent for this saying, I don't think so, but if there is I'm afraid I don't know it :)
    the more common translation is "de praktijk zal het uitwijzen"
     

    Greetd

    Member
    Dutch - Belgium
    I really think it means something different, and I have a strong suspicion that there is no Dutch equivalent, but oh well, who listens to native speakers these days ;)
     

    killerbees

    Senior Member
    English [US]
    I'm listening :) and I certainly don't expect a perfect match. Does the Dutch expression imply that you have to try things to judge them? If it doesn't, then we're back at square one (and probably just have to translate it sans idiom).
     

    Greetd

    Member
    Dutch - Belgium
    It doesn't :) From what I gather, it has two possible meanings; it means something like "if you do it, you'll learn how to", which is said about things like learning how to cook, or learning how to play an instrument. It is also used with the meaning "we can't exactly predict this or that, but we'll figure it out as we go along"; for example, when organizing an event, the organizer could say, "We've booked a venue that can host events of up to 500 people. If this will be big enough, we don't know, but 'de praktijk zal het uitwijzen'." The latter is the more commonly used meaning, I think.

    Maybe you could use something like "dit wil je niet missen" in your translation? :)
     

    jacquesvd

    Senior Member
    Dutch
    I really think it means something different, and I have a strong suspicion that there is no Dutch equivalent, but oh well, who listens to native speakers these days ;)
    Well, I am a native speaker and since my youth the common translation has been 'de praktijk zal het uitwijzen'

    I do believe it covers the meaning because "the proof of the pudding is in the eating" means that only the eating will tell you if the pudding is good and so will only 'practice' tell you that your theory works. There is therefore an absolute analogy with 'de praktijk zal het uitwijzen"

    I concur with you that 'de praktijk zal het leren' is slightly different because here one supposes that the practice will not only tell you if your hypothesis stands but practice will also teach you something.

    In the English expression the eating will tell you if the pudding is good or not but will not teach you in anyway whatsoever how to make a better pudding.
     

    Greetd

    Member
    Dutch - Belgium
    I do believe it covers the meaning because "the proof of the pudding is in the eating" means that only the eating will tell you if the pudding is good and so will only 'practice' tell you that your theory works. There is therefore an absolute analogy with 'de praktijk zal het uitwijzen"
    Except that "the proof of the pudding is in the eating" is used when you invite someone to a wonderful experience, they are hesitant, and you say, "you'll see it's fantastic, just believe me". That still means something wholly different than someone saying "practice will tell me if my estimates or theories were right".

    Another big difference: the saying "the proof of the pudding is in the eating" is said by someone who wants to convince someone to do something, he wants to convince that person that the experience is worth doing.
    The saying "de praktijk zal het leren/uitwijzen" is said by someone who wants to do something himself, in order to see if his own theory was right.
    So the perspectives don't match. :)
     

    Suehil

    Medemod
    British English
    In this particular context 'the proof of the pudding...' is used as an invitation, but normally it is not. I would go as far as to say that this is a slightly unusual use of the phrase.
    Usually it means exactly what jacquesvd says, only by eating the pudding will you know if it is any good.
     

    jacquesvd

    Senior Member
    Dutch
    Except that "the proof of the pudding is in the eating" is used when you invite someone to a wonderful experience, they are hesitant, and you say, "you'll see it's fantastic, just believe me". That still means something wholly different than someone saying "practice will tell me if my estimates or theories were right".

    Another big difference: the saying "the proof of the pudding is in the eating" is said by someone who wants to convince someone to do something, he wants to convince that person that the experience is worth doing.
    The saying "de praktijk zal het leren/uitwijzen" is said by someone who wants to do something himself, in order to see if his own theory was right.
    So the perspectives don't match. :)
    I don't agree: I'm not excluding that you could use the saying in the way you describe but it is not its normal usage. I have worked for 42 years in a US company and heard engineers say after they repaired a piece of equipment and were immediately lauded for it: just wait: 'the proof of the pudding is in the eating' exactly meaning what 'de praktijk zal het uitwijzen' also means.
     

    killerbees

    Senior Member
    English [US]
    In this particular context 'the proof of the pudding...' is used as an invitation, but normally it is not. I would go as far as to say that this is a slightly unusual use of the phrase.
    Usually it means exactly what jacquesvd says, only by eating the pudding will you know if it is any good.
    I think this is really the heart of the argument. Obviously, as I am not a native speaker, I am no Dutch idioms expert, but de praktijk zal het uitwijzen seems to match the English idiom fairly well. However, based on the provided context, I think that the proof of the pudding is in the eating just doesn't fit here, at least not without some loss of its original nuance.

    Couldn't you just say, "Dit zal je toch verassend leuk vinden!" or, "Dit wil je niet missen!" as Greetd said? (Feel free to delete that toch, though. I still find modal particles somewhat problematic :D)

    Edit: PS -- Maybe even "Je moet het wel proberen, hoor!"
     
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    jacquesvd

    Senior Member
    Dutch
    I think this is really the heart of the argument. Obviously, as I am not a native speaker, I am no Dutch idioms expert, but de praktijk zal het uitwijzen seems to match the English idiom fairly well. However, based on the provided context, I think that the proof of the pudding is in the eating just doesn't fit here, at least without some loss of its original nuance.

    Couldn't you just say, "Dit zal je toch verassend leuk vinden!" or, "Dit wil je niet missen!" as Greetd said? (Feel free to delete that toch, though. I still find modal particles somewhat problematic :D)

    Edit: PS -- Maybe even "Je moet het wel proberen, hoor!"
    I concentrated on the translation of the normal meaning of "the proof of the pudding is in the eating" which really is 'de praktijk zal het uitwijzen' but I concur that the English idiom probably doesn't very well fit Luna's intention. Greetd's suggestions to translate Luna's original intention are very much ok. There are probably many more possibilities but I don't immediately see one that could classify as a standing idiom.

    "Kom (mee) en laat je heerlijk verrassen" or "Probeer met ons een wonderbaarlijke verrassing" etc could be other possibilities, but surely no better than Greetd's suggestions. However, in all these suggestions, it seems the invitor has tested the 'surprise' the invitee is supposed to discover.
     

    Greetd

    Member
    Dutch - Belgium
    Ooh now I understand! I didn't realize that the meaning Luna gave was not the usual meaning of the saying, so my apologies :) It's probably indeed better then to try an alternative translation. :)
     

    jacquesvd

    Senior Member
    Dutch
    Ooh now I understand! I didn't realize that the meaning Luna gave was not the usual meaning of the saying, so my apologies :) It's probably indeed better then to try an alternative translation. :)
    No need to apologise, there's always the risk that something escapes you. In this case I was so concentrated on the normal translation for this standing idiom that I had completely forgotten about Luna's intention, which you had very well noticed!
     
    Hi Brown, Greets, Jacquesvd, Killerbees and Suehil!

    Originally I had in my mind to translate the italian equivalent of "The proof of the pudding..", which is: "Provare per credere" ('trying for believing'??),
    but - ahimè - the "equivalent" expression in Dutch is all about practice and theory! :)

    Of course, Greetd's observations and suggestions are all right.
    Nevertheless, for the very specific context we had to choose another expression.

    All the same: thank you very much! :)
     
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    jacquesvd

    Senior Member
    Dutch
    Hi Brown, Greets, Jacquesvd, Killerbees and Suehil!

    Originally I had in my mind to translate the italian equivalent of "The proof of the pudding..", which is: "Provare per credere" ('trying for believing'??),
    but - ahimè - the "equivalent" expression in dutch is all about practice and theory! :)

    Of course, Greetd's observations and suggestions are all right.
    Nevertheless, for the very specific context we had to choose another expression.

    All the same: thank you very much! :)
    We, of course, concentrated on 'the proof of the pudding is in the eating' but "provare per credere" would be something like 'just try and you'll see' which in Dutch would be 'eerst doen en dan geloven'
     
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