the purpose which we find it actually to answer

Howard Cha

Senior Member
Korean-Korea
~~~ artificers who formed it for the purpose which we find it actually to answer

I'm wondering if the phrase above is grammatically correct and if so, what it means.


Below is the whole passage.

If we found an object such as a watch upon a heath, even if we didn't know how it had come into existence, its own precision and intricacy of design would force us to conclude that the watch must have had a maker: there must have existed, at some time, and at some place or other, an artificer or artificers, who formed it for the purpose which we find it actually to answer, who comprehended its construction, and designed its use.

Many thanks,
Howard Cha
 
  • Englishmypassion

    Senior Member
    India - Hindi
    The highlighted sentence part is really problematic, at least the "to answer" at the end (both grammatically and semantically) - - maybe it could have been replaced by "serving". If that's the intended meaning, "actually" is redundant. And "made/invented" would be better than "formed", I think.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    What is the source of your text? This does not appear to be modern English (ie, English written within the last 100 years).

    Who made it for the use which we find it is intended. The word "actually" is not redundant.

    We find a device which we don't recognise. We wonder what it does - its hands move - we discover what it is actually intended to do - it tells the time. Somebody must have made it to do that (for that purpose).
     

    Howard Cha

    Senior Member
    Korean-Korea
    The highlighted sentence part is really problematic, at least the "to answer" at the end (both grammatically and semantically) - - maybe it could have been replaced by "serving". If that's the intended meaning, "actually" is redundant. And "made/invented" would be better than "formed", I think.

    thank you,
     

    Howard Cha

    Senior Member
    Korean-Korea
    What is the source of your text? This does not appear to be modern English (ie, English written within the last 100 years).

    Who made it for the use which we find it is intended. The word "actually" is not redundant.

    We find a device which we don't recognise. We wonder what it does - its hands move - we discover what it is actually intended to do - it tells the time. Somebody must have made it to do that (for that purpose).
    thank you,
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    People who answer questions here want to be helpful. In return, people asking questions are expected to do so helpfully. That's why we ask for source, background and context. Let's rewrite your question.
    --------
    In a blog about Christian Apologetics Methods of Apologetic Practice | Christian Apologetics Project the writer quotes the nineteenth century British philosopher William Paley, who wrote:

    If we found an object such as a watch upon a heath, even if we didn't know how it had come into existence, its own precision and intricacy of design would force us to conclude that the watch must have had a maker: there must have existed, at some time, and at some place or other, an artificer or artificers, who formed it for the purpose which we find it actually to answer, who comprehended its construction, and designed its use.

    I'm wondering if the phrase I have highlighted is grammatically correct and if so, what it means.
    -------
    Now we know where you found it, what the topic was that was being discussed, who wrote it, and when it was written. And we don't have to guess anything or go off to another website to make sure our answers are accurate.

    PS. Yes it is grammatically correct.
     

    Howard Cha

    Senior Member
    Korean-Korea
    People who answer questions here want to be helpful. In return, people asking questions are expected to do so helpfully. That's why we ask for source, background and context. Let's rewrite your question.
    --------
    In a blog about Christian Apologetics Methods of Apologetic Practice | Christian Apologetics Project the writer quotes the nineteenth century British philosopher William Paley, who wrote:

    If we found an object such as a watch upon a heath, even if we didn't know how it had come into existence, its own precision and intricacy of design would force us to conclude that the watch must have had a maker: there must have existed, at some time, and at some place or other, an artificer or artificers, who formed it for the purpose which we find it actually to answer, who comprehended its construction, and designed its use.

    I'm wondering if the phrase I have highlighted is grammatically correct and if so, what it means.
    -------
    Now we know where you found it, what the topic was that was being discussed, who wrote it, and when it was written. And we don't have to guess anything or go off to another website to make sure our answers are accurate.

    PS. Yes it is grammatically correct.
    How about semantically?
     
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