the revolving door between....such that you wonder

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Irelia20150604

Senior Member
Chinese
Source: What The Budget Deal Means For Medicare Drug Prices

<The new budget will likely lower the cost of expensive prescription drugs for Medicare patients. Elisabeth Rosenthal of Kaiser Health News talks with NPR's Scott Simon.>

SIMON: That's Alex Azar - has been appointed Secretary of Health and Human Services. Is he the kind of choice that gives you optimism that prescription drug prices will come down?

ROSENTHAL: Well, there's a certain argument to be made that Alex Azar of all people on Earth understands how the games are played and how these suits and countersuits about making generics or making biosimilars have held up the arrival on the U.S. market and have raised prices for everyone. On the other hand, there's ongoing concern about the revolving door between government and pharmaceutical companies such that you wonder, is their loyalty to the American people, or is their loyalty to the pharmaceutical world from which they came?
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Hi everyone! How should I understand the bold part? Thanks in advance.
 
  • PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    The problem with transcripts is that, in all languages, the written and spoken language is different, with the spoken language having more immediacy and far greater context.

    A revolving door - mainly AE - describes a system of repetitive action that takes a circular form and produces no change in the basic problem.

    I think that it was first used in opposition to the idea of shortening the sentences of certain types of criminal in order to reduce imprisonment costs, which was taken to mean "imprisoning more criminals but releasing them earlier" but then (the "revolving door" argument went) "those criminals would then commit more crime that required more of them to be imprisoned and that would cost more."

    The nature of the revolving door should be clear in the context - although in your extract (i.e. not context) it is not particularly clear.
     
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