The rock of ages

Steno1

Senior Member
Italian
Hi there,

Just bumped into this sentence:

It is significant how the focus of Hong Kong's worry has moved from what had seemed to be the most worrisome variable ( Beijing ) to what had once seemed the Rock of ages ( Washington)

E' significativo come il punto cruciale delle preoccupazioni di HK si e' spostato da cio' che sembrava essere la variabile piu' preoccupante ( Pechino) a cio' che una volta sembrava fosse ......roccia solida/vecchia :confused: :( ( Washington)

Thanks

Steno1
 
  • zipp404

    Senior Member
    Bilingual English | Español
    The rock of ages = la roccia di tutte le età, la roccia che perdura per tutte le età

    il potere perenne; il perenne potere (USA)

    or:

    il solidissimo potere , sostenitore, alleato (del capitalismo dell'Inghilterra e di Hong Kong)
     
    Last edited:

    virgi_vikk

    Member
    Italian
    Hello Everybody,
    I came across the expression 'rock of ages' but in a completely different context:

    Lilibet also had a great weakness for this, which was the good old-fashioned barley sugar known as 'Rock of Ages'.

    Anche Lilibet aveva una predilezione per questa tradizionale caramella all'orzo, conosciuta come 'Caramella perenne'.

    Thank you.
     

    Mary49

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Ciao,
    non so se si tratti di caramelle, forse è semplicemente "zucchero d'orzo".
    products_old-barley-sugar_300x300.jpg

    Nel testo si parla di "coffee sugar"...
     

    theartichoke

    Senior Member
    English - Canada
    Lilibet also had a great weakness for this, which was the good old-fashioned barley sugar known as 'Rock of Ages'.
    For what it's worth (which isn't much, in terms of helping with translation), I'll point out that "Rock of Ages" seems to be a pun on the traditional hymn by the same name and the traditional English boiled sweet known as "rock." I'd assumed they were talking about a stick of rock made of barley sugar, but Mary is right: whatever this "coffee sugar" is (I'd never heard of the stuff before), the context clearly indicates that it comes in small pieces. Why it got the nickname of "Rock of Ages" is beyond me: if you're meant to dissolve it in your coffee to sweeten it, perhaps the point is that it takes forever to dissolve? This would be a good quality if it were a stick of rock; not so great if it's supposed to sweeten a drink. Maybe there's a BE speaker on the forum who knows?
     

    tsoapm

    Senior Member
    🇬🇧 English (England)
    Is it BE? I’ve never heard of it before. I’m aware of the hymn, but not very familiar with it despite a long church background. We have sticks of “rock”, yes, but I don’t imagine this is immediately connected. I suppose this is just a nickname based on the idea of it being hard and either lasting a long time physically or being around for a long time in general.
     

    theartichoke

    Senior Member
    English - Canada
    Is it BE? I’ve never heard of it before. I’m aware of the hymn, but not very familiar with it despite a long church background. We have sticks of “rock”, yes, but I don’t imagine this is immediately connected. I suppose this is just a nickname based on the idea of it being hard and either lasting a long time physically or being around for a long time in general.
    The line comes from The Little Princesses by Marion Crawford, the Queen's childhood governess, so barley sugar "Rock of Ages," whatever it was, is BE from the 1930s.
     
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