(the) Save-on-Foods

HolyUnicorn

Senior Member
Mandarin / the Shanghai Dialect
Hello,

One stop after another, I kept searching for the bold green sign of the Save-on-Foods that had served as a handy reminder for me to get off. But when the bus reached the end of the line, I found myself hopelessly lost. I asked several passersby for directions and one of them told me reassuringly, “No worries. I will walk you to (the) Save-on-Foods.

I wrote these sentences.

Do I need “the” in the part in bold? The part in bold refers to the Save-on-Foods that had served as a handy reminder for me to get off the bus.
 
  • HolyUnicorn

    Senior Member
    Mandarin / the Shanghai Dialect
    I can certainly accept "the" here. This is a specific one. But I am wondering how come it is possible without (the) here.
     
    Last edited:

    Chez

    Senior Member
    English English
    'Save-on-Foods' is obviously the name of a shop or business. So you can use it without 'the'.

    In the UK we have a well-known shop called Marks and Spencer, which has outlets on many High Streets.

    In the original example you gave, it is fine to say: No worries. I will walk you to Marks and Spencer.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    I agree with Chez.

    The way I look at it, the version with "the" is a common shortened form of a slightly longer phrase.

    I will walk you to the Save-on-Foods (store).

    It's so common that almost no one would say "store" at the end.

    I will walk you to Save-on-Foods.

    That's just calling the store directly by its name, kind of like it was a person. ("I will take you to John.")
     
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