the school took $20,000 a year off the tuition

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LQZ

Senior Member
Mandarin
He was one of 1,300 applicants for 60 positions (eventually class size will double) in the inaugural class at The Commonwealth, according to Dr. Robert M. D’Alessandri, the president and dean. Mr. Allen has a United States Navy scholarship, but for his classmates, the school took $20,000 a year off the tuition, a reduction of about half, as an incentive to take the risk of a new school.---taken from the NYT
Dear all,

What I understand the meaning of the quoted text is that the school exempts his classmates from about half of tuition each year, so the verb took should be takes. Am I right? Thanks.


LQZ
 
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  • JamesM

    Senior Member
    Not necessarily each year, but for these students the school discounted tuition by half in order to entice them to try a new school. This may be a one-time offer for the students who enter the school this year.

    They did not have to take half off Mr. Allen's tuition because his tuition is paid in full by the U.S. Navy.
     

    LQZ

    Senior Member
    Mandarin
    JamesM, can I think took is implying that the discount is a one-time offer? and if school offers a ecah-year discount, takes should be used? Thanks again.
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    JamesM, can I think took is implying that the discount is a one-time offer? and if school offers a ecah-year discount, takes should be used? Thanks again.
    Yes, I think that is a reasonable assumption. It doesn't make sense that they would set a tuition amount and discount it by half for everyone each year. This is most likely a one-time offer (although it may apply to all four years for these particular students) because the school is new.
     

    LQZ

    Senior Member
    Mandarin
    Yes, I think that is a reasonable assumption. It doesn't make sense that they would set a tuition amount and discount it by half for everyone each year. This is most likely a one-time offer (although it may apply to all four years for these particular students) because the school is new.
    Thanks, JamesM, I've got it.:)
     

    mimiluau

    Senior Member
    USA
    English-UK
    "Took" is correct here, because the school's decision to take $20,000 a year off the classmate's tuition has been definitely taken in the past.

    "Takes" would be correct if maybe the school's decision to take $20,000 a year off the tuition was not set in stone, for example if it was something that could come up for review. If you insert "takes," it implies a current state of events instead of a more permanent one, the meaning would be something like this:

    "The school (currently) takes $20,000 a year off the tuition"'

    meaning that there is the possibility that they may not in the future continue this grant.
     

    LQZ

    Senior Member
    Mandarin
    Thank you,mimiluau and Myridon, for your help. Recently, I have troube with tense and I need time to digest what your said. Thanks again.
     

    LQZ

    Senior Member
    Mandarin
    Hi, I am back with another question about tense.

    Regardless of the possibility whether the medicine school would exempt those students from about half of tuition each year, if I am going to express it is a each year discount, can I write like this?

    ...Mr. Allen has a United States Navy scholarship, but for his classmates, the school would take $20,000 each year off the tuition, a reduction of about half, as an incentive to take the risk of a new school.

    Does it make sense? Thanks.
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    It makes sense as an offer. "If you would decide to attend our school, we would take $20,000 of the tuition for each year you are here." It is conditional and it doesn't indicate that the condition has been met. It wouldn't make sense in this context because his classmates are only classmates because they took the offer. It has already happened for them.
     
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