the secrets have been lost

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chopin7

Senior Member
Albanian
Hello

It's this documentary "Secretes of Viking Sword".
Narrator says, "The secrets behind its design, creation and use have been lost".

I understand what he says, but I don't think I ever seen this form "secrets are lost".
Is this some strange form or a common occurrence?

Thank you
 
  • ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    Hullo Chop. :confused::confused::confused: There's nothing unusual about have been lost ~ it's a straightforward passive verb:

    Modern man has forgotten the secrets [ACTIVE]
    The secrets have been forgotten [PASSIVE]
     

    chopin7

    Senior Member
    Albanian
    Thank you, Ewie.
    I meant the choice of the verb "lose" to be associated with "secret".
    Your "forgotten", for example, is okay for my ear.
    "Lose" was a bit off for me.
    Or maybe I am being too choosy.
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    I understand what he says, but I don't think I ever seen this form "secrets are lost".
    Is this some strange form or a common occurrence?
    It is very common: If you put "The lost secret of" into any search engine, you will be rewarded with millions of hits.

    There would hardly be any mystery books if secrets were not lost on a regular basis... :D
     

    Mahantongo

    Senior Member
    English (U.S.)
    One meaning of "secret" is (to use the definition given by Merriam-Webster) "a method, formula, or process used in an art or operation and divulged only to those of one's own company or craft." It is very easy that the knowledge of how to do something could be lost over time; for example, the secret of the granulation technique used by Etruscan goldsmiths was "lost" for centuries, and was only rediscovered in the last 100 years.
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    Thank you, Ewie.
    I meant the choice of the verb "lose" to be associated with "secret".
    Your "forgotten", for example, is okay for my ear.
    "Lose" was a bit off for me.
    Or maybe I am being too choosy.
    :thumbsup: I thought you were talking about the grammar of it. (Obviously.)
     
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