The server looks down

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Harbard

New Member
French
Hi,
I'd just like to know if the sentence "The server looks down" is valid. In that it means that the server appears to be down.
Someone tells me that "look down" is a phrasal verb (as in look down upon something), and that it can't be used to mean "seem down".

Thanks
 
  • entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    Even without the usual meaning of 'look down' (as from a height) to interfere with it, 'down' doesn't seem to work in 'seems down' either. :cross:'The server seems down' seems wrong, possibly because 'down' isn't an adjective there. 'You seem down' can be said to someone who seems gloomy, probably because it is an adjective there, though we can't talk about a :cross:down person (or a :cross:down server).
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    The server looks down
    The server looks to be down.

    From looking at the server or whatever other symptoms are present, we conclude that the likely cause of our problems is that the server is not "up", i.e. fully booted up in a working state.

    The server appears to be in the state described as "down" (in the way that word is routinely used for computers).
     

    AnythingGoes

    Senior Member
    English - USA (Midwest/Appalachia)
    Hi,
    I'd just like to know if the sentence "The server looks down" is valid. In that it means that the server appears to be down.
    Someone tells me that "look down" is a phrasal verb (as in look down upon something), and that it can't be used to mean "seem down".
    It isn't a phrasal verb, but in American English a person can look (i.e., "appear") down ("depressed"). Context would have to establish that meaning rather than, say, a waiter looking down at the floor. :)
     

    AnythingGoes

    Senior Member
    English - USA (Midwest/Appalachia)
    Thank you all for your answers!

    About the context, the sentence comes from this website: Is justadownexample.com down? --> It's not just you! justadownexample.com looks down from here.
    Ah. If you'd included the context in the original post, we could have told you that it's using "down" to mean not functioning. The sample sentence works as I explained it in post #6, but down doesn't mean "depressed" in this case. :)
     

    Harbard

    New Member
    French
    Yes, I guess I should have given the context in the original post, my bad!

    So, in this context, looks down is correctly used ?
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    See my post #4.

    "It looks like it's down" or "It looks to be down" is what I would say.

    With the addition of "from here" then I think you can simplify the first part and just say "looks down from here".
     
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