The sign reads...

sakvaka

Senior Member
Hello!

When we want to tell about something written somewhere, we may use different structures.

i) read
Finnish: Mitä siinä lukee? lit. "What there reads?" > What does it read?
Tässä artikkelissa lukee, että kaikki ihmiset ovat tasa-arvoisia. "In this article reads that all men are created equal."
English: We saw a funny sign. It read...

ii) stand
Swedish: Vad står det på skylten? lit. "What stands it on the sign?"
Dutch: In het rapport staat verder dat Noorwegen, Nederland en Finland model staan voor... lit. "In the report stands that Norway, the Netherlands and Finland..."
Finnish: Mitä siinä seisoo? lit. "What there stands?"*

iii) something else?

Share us your thoughts! Thanks.

* Note: This use is considered dialectal, colloquial and non-Finnish since it has obviously been adopted from Swedish. Lukea verb is more "official".
 
  • Rallino

    Moderatoúrkos
    Turkish
    Turkish:
    I and II aren't possible.

    IIIa. Write
    Tabelada ne yazıyor?
    lit."What is it writing on the sign?" > What is written on the sign?

    IIIb. Tell
    Tabela ne diyor? lit."What is the sign telling?"
     
    Last edited:

    Orlin

    Banned
    български
    Russian falls into iii) something else:
    на нем написано /na niom napisano/ - on it it's written.
    In Bulgarian it's possible to use this model too: На знака (него) е написано, but I think that На знака (него) пише is much commoner - it uses impersonal active 3rd p. sg. in the present tense instead of passive.
     

    ilocas2

    Banned
    Czech
    In Czech:

    Tady je napsáno/napsané (coll. napsaný), že... - Here is written, that...
    Tady píšou - They write here
    Tady se píše - It writes here (impersonal)

    Tady říkají (coll. říkaj) - They say here
    Tady se říká - It says here (impersonal)

    Tady stojí - It stands here - less common
     
    Last edited:

    Zio Gilito

    Senior Member
    Español - España
    In Spanish we use the verb "to say" (decir) too:
    ¿Qué decía el cartel? - What did the sign say?
    However, you can also use the verb "poner" (to put):
    ¿Has visto ese cartel? ¿Qué ponía? = Did you see the sign? What was put on it?
     

    Selyd

    Senior Member
    ucraniano
    In ukrainian:
    - що там написано /tsho tam napysano/ write
    - про що там пишуть /tsho tam pyshut'/ write
    - про що йдеться /pro tsho ydet'sya/ go
    - що там друкують /tsho tam drukuyut'/ print
    - що там говорять /tsho tam hovoryat'/ tell
    - що там сказано /tsho tam skazano/ say
     
    Greek falls into category III (something else), more specifically:
    -«Γράφει» ('ɣrafi), third person, present, nominative of verb «γράφω» ('ɣrafo)-->to write; so, "what does the sign write/is writing?"
    -«Δείχνει» ('ðixni), third person, present, nominative of verb «δείχνω» ('ðixno)-->to show, point out; so "what does the sign show/is showing?" or "what does the sign point out/is pointing out?"
    In every-day language one could hear «λέει» ('lei), third person, present, nominative of verb «λέω» ('leo)-->to say; so even the use of the verb «λέω» "what does the sign say/is saying?" is possible but is considered colloquialism

    [ɣ] is a voiced velar fricative
    [ð] is a voiced dental non-sibilant fricative
    [x] is a voiceless velar fricative, known as the hard ch

    Happy new year!
     

    ThomasK

    Senior Member
    Belgium, Dutch
    The funny thing is that the sounding in Dutch is not to be taken literally (acoustics). If it is, we would use 'klinken' (to sound, literally). The 'luiden' has to do with sounds, but now only of church bells, and in this particular expression, not elsewhere, so I think..
     

    Tjahzi

    Senior Member
    Swedish (Göteborg)
    In ukrainian:
    - що там написано /tsho tam napysano/ write
    - про що там пишуть /tsho tam pyshut'/ write
    - про що йдеться /pro tsho ydet'sya/ go
    - що там друкують /tsho tam drukuyut'/ print
    - що там говорять /tsho tam hovoryat'/ tell
    - що там сказано /tsho tam skazano/ say
    Could you please explain why про is added to the first two constructions.
    Also, is it really the case that 3.rd person plural (rather than the singular) form should be used? As in, is the following construction correct?

    Щто на знаку говорять/друкують? (Or should it be говорить/друкує?)
     

    Selyd

    Senior Member
    ucraniano
    Could you please explain why про is added to the first two constructions.
    Also, is it really the case that 3.rd person plural (rather than the singular) form should be used? As in, is the following construction correct?
    Щто на знаку говорять/друкують? (Or should it be говорить/друкує?)
    If I correctly understand a question, the speech goes about a signboard, poster, the announcement. Is written by the large letters, is printed finely etc.
    - That there is written
    - About what there write
    - About what there is a speech
    - That there is printed
    - That there speak
    - That there is said
    The case 3.rd person singular gives an ironic shade.
    І що ж він там говорить? Also that he there speaks?
     

    Selyd

    Senior Member
    ucraniano
    that makes sense, thank you!

    Also, is it fair to assume that ukrainian про corresponds to russian о?
    - что там написано
    - о чем там пишут
    - о чем идет речь
    - что там напечатано
    - о чем там говорят
    - что там сказано
     

    Tjahzi

    Senior Member
    Swedish (Göteborg)
    - что там написано
    - о чем там пишут
    - о чем идет речь
    - что там напечатано
    - о чем там говорят
    - что там сказано
    I take that as a yes, with the additional comment that Russian demands о with verbs (but obviously not with adverbs) whereas Ukrainian is not as strict?
     

    merquiades

    Senior Member
    English (USA Northeast)
    Is this valid for British English, as well?
    Perhaps a Brit will answer but I believe it is possible to say both "the sign says" or "the sign reads". They both sound okay to me but I prefer "the sign says."

    I'll add French since no one has replied
    "Le panneau/ La pancarte/ L'enseigne indique...." (indicates)
     

    ThomasK

    Senior Member
    Belgium, Dutch
    Is there no way of referring to the kind of text then? I'll try to ask a French-speaking member...

    She reacted very quickly and told me :
    - "sur la carte il est écrit", etc.,

    And she referred to a thread where I find :
    - "un signe qui dit"
    - ...des maisons portant un écriteau où on peut lire : « Le propriétaire habite encore ici. »
    - ...des maisons avec un écriteau portant la mention
     
    Last edited:
    Greek falls into category III (something else), more specifically:
    -«Γράφει» ('ɣrafi), third person, present, nominative of verb «γράφω» ('ɣrafo)-->to write; so, "what does the sign write/is writing?"
    -«Δείχνει» ('ðixni), third person, present, nominative of verb «δείχνω» ('ðixno)-->to show, point out; so "what does the sign show/is showing?" or "what does the sign point out/is pointing out?"
    In every-day language one could hear «λέει» ('lei), third person, present, nominative of verb «λέω» ('leo)-->to say; so even the use of the verb «λέω» "what does the sign say/is saying?" is possible but is considered colloquialism

    [ɣ] is a voiced velar fricative
    [ð] is a voiced dental non-sibilant fricative
    [x] is a voiceless velar fricative, known as the hard ch

    Happy new year!
    I apologise for quoting myself but I just noticed i've made a serious mistake. It's not nominative (case) but indicative (mood)
     

    Dymn

    Senior Member
    Catalan uses dir "to say":

    Què hi diu?
    Al cartell hi diu que...
    El cartell diu que...


    However some people, which is a recent Spanish influence, would use posar ("to put"): Què hi posa? (or directly Què posa? :rolleyes:)

    However, you can also use the verb "poner" (to put):
    ¿Has visto ese cartel? ¿Qué ponía? = Did you see the sign? What was put on it?
    I think poner is the most usual verb. I'd say:

    ¿Qué pone?
    En el cartel pone que...
    El cartel dice/pone que...
    (both are possible)

    Rezar (lit. "to pray") can also be used but it's very formal.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top