The skier swallowed up the slope.

Garachico

Senior Member
English - USA & Français - France
The skier swallowed up the slope.


Cerco un verbo italiano per esprimere «scendere a una velocità tremenda».

Si può utilizzare «ingoiare» a questo fine, di forma metaforica? Ad esempio, si capisce una frase come la seguente?

Lo sciatore ha ingoiato la pista.

Vi viene in mente qualche verbo più addatto?
 
  • Garachico

    Senior Member
    English - USA & Français - France
    sfrecciare, divorare, eccellente, grazie.

    «sfrecciare» può essere transitivo?
    Ad esempio, «Lui ha sfrecciato la strada / le scale»?
     

    theartichoke

    Senior Member
    English - Canada
    The skier swallowed up the slope.
    It's been ages since I've skied, but is this a common expression? It sounds really odd to me, because of the "up": as if "to swallow" was a motion (e.g., to dart like a swallow) and the skier was somehow going up the slope. I'd instantly understand "devoured the slope," or something of the kind, but not "swallowed up." Maybe it's just me? :)
     

    Garachico

    Senior Member
    English - USA & Français - France
    What's the point in making up a sentence that is not idiomatic? :confused:

    It's not wrong. It's not an idiom (i.e., a saying), but it's idiomatic. It makes sense. It's just a metaphor.
    To eat up, to swallow up, to gobble, to devour… all valid metaphors to go through something quickly (a book for instance.)
    Also, it's just the thread's title, not the content of the post.
     

    You little ripper!

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    It's not wrong. It's not an idiom (i.e., a saying), but it's idiomatic. It makes sense. It's just a metaphor.
    To eat up, to swallow up, to gobble, to devour… all valid metaphors to go through something quickly (a book for instance.)
    Also, it's just the thread's title, not the content of the post.
    Garachico, it's not idiomatic in Australian English and doesn't appear to be in Canadian English either (see theartichoke's post 6). Esky's suggestion (tore) is. 🙂
     

    Garachico

    Senior Member
    English - USA & Français - France
    Wonderful. It looks like the description of a dream. "Lo sciatore volò su per la pista come una rondine"

    To add to the "swallowing up" metaphor, I see a pacman gobbling up all those little pills along the way at top speed.
    There are about fifty thousand metaphors I could have chosen for this idea of going down a slope at top speed. Devouring, flying down, etc. As far as I know, all metaphors are legal, even if some are better than others.

    Again, the body of the post never even referred to the specific metaphor. And to my defense, I never claimed to be any kind of Hemingway.

    That being said, if some of you were made to feel uncomfortable by the specific metaphor I chose for the title of this thread, I'd like to sincerely apologize. My brain wasn't working right, that happens a lot. At this stage, I really don't know how to make things right for you. Or should I edit the title of the top thread to something more to your liking? Just say the word.
     
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    london calling

    Senior Member
    UK English
    It's not wrong. It's not an idiom (i.e., a saying), but it's idiomatic. It makes sense. It's just a metaphor.
    To eat up, to swallow up, to gobble, to devour… all valid metaphors to go through something quickly (a book for instance.)
    Also, it's just the thread's title, not the content of the post.
    It isn't idiomatic because we don't say it that way in English. It sounds weird to my English ears, even as a metaphor.

    He tore down the slope (at a rate of knots).:)
     

    metazoan

    Senior Member
    US English
    To me the phrase doesn't just mean the skier went fast, it also expresses that the skier was in control of the situation, as one is with one's food.
     
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