The slide is smooth and cool

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cyanista

законодательница мод
NRW
Belarusian/Russian
Hello,

one more question inspired by the English-Italian dictionary (I've got a few more coming :p ):

The slide is smooth and cool, and the children love to play on it.


What does cool mean here? Is it cool as in "not hot" or cool as in "great"?
 
  • nzseries1

    Senior Member
    New Zealand - English
    It's hard to say without any other context... but my first guess would be that it means "not hot", because:

    1) it's more likely given that it is a dictionary definition, and
    2) who likes a hot slide? :D

    But of course, it could mean either :)
     

    Q-cumber

    Senior Member
    It's hard to say without any other context... but my first guess would be that it means "not hot", because:

    1) it's more likely given that it is a dictionary definition, and
    2) who likes a hot slide? :D

    But of course, it could mean either :)
    I'd like to mention that the phrase if of an American origin. ;) Actually, I hadn't hear the word in its "awesome" meaning in NZ that often.
     

    Driven

    Senior Member
    USA/English
    I agree with nzseries1. It probably means "not hot". That's what it sounds like to me. If it meant "great" it would probably say something like: "The slide is really cool and it's smooth and the children love to slide on it."

    It's just a guess but that's what it sounds like to me.
     

    Q-cumber

    Senior Member
    Hi Driven!

    I agree,at first sight it appears that "cool" means "not hot" ... but, should we talk about an ice slide, have you ever seen a hot one? :)
    What do you think about the following phrase: The water in the pool is fresh and wet, and the children love to swim in it.? :)
     

    dn88

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Seems that our WR English-French Dictionary doesn't interpret it as "not hot":

    CLICK HERE

    Maybe we should ask the person who penned that sentence. :D
     

    dn88

    Senior Member
    Polish
    I'm not sure what you mean, dn88. You have directed us to the word slide--not the word, cool. I agree that cool means not hot in this context.
    I mean, you can find our sentence and its French translation if you follow the link that I posted earlier. And my point is that the French one uses a word the meaning of which is not "not hot".
     

    Haylette

    Senior Member
    UK, English
    What do you think about the following phrase: The water in the pool is fresh and wet, and the children love to swim in it.?
    I'm not entirely sure what this has to do with the original question, but I for one think that it's slightly unnecessary to tell people that the water is wet. I haven't come across any dry water before. :)
     

    Q-cumber

    Senior Member
    I'm not entirely sure what this has to do with the original question, but I for one think that it's slightly unnecessary to tell people that the water is wet. I haven't come across any dry water before. :)
    Right...actually, I meant that it wasn't necessary to tell people that the slide was cool either. :)
     

    nzseries1

    Senior Member
    New Zealand - English
    Right...actually, I meant that it wasn't necessary to tell people that the slide was cool either. :)
    Slides are frequently hot, in some cases too hot to slide on if they've been in direct sunlight all day! Well, they were where I grew up!

    Therefore stating that a slide is cool is extremely necessary, in my opinion :)
     

    Haylette

    Senior Member
    UK, English
    Slides are frequently hot, in some cases too hot to slide on if they've been in direct sunlight all day! Well, they were where I grew up!
    I grew up in England, but even I'm aware of the hazards of a sun-heated slide on bare legs. :)
     

    Q-cumber

    Senior Member
    In our part of the world ice slides are more common. :)
    However, let's review the phrase in whole... <please correct me if I am wrong>
    The part "children love to play on it" implies that the slide is kinda permanently attractive for the children...these guys are not just enjoying their play at the moment, but generally like the place. If this is true, both smoothness and coolness should be permanent attributes of the slide. Well, if a chute was initally smooth, it will remain so within an extended period of time. But what about the temperature of the surface? It depends on partuclar weather conditions and so on. Thus, the "coolness" isn't a constant feature of the subject, in contradistinction to its "excellentness", so to speak.
    That's why my vote is for the "great" meaning.
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    The dictionary definition (in English) this sentence illustrates is for a playground slide, which would be the most common slide where I live. Thus I imagine it would be a metal slide.

    Actually I think the sentence is just weird. If it is a metal slide, it is better that it be cool than hot, as nzseries points out, and useful information if it is. However, that is not the first thought I have in mind when I think about describing a playground slide. "Cool slide" brought a water slide to my mind. Q-Cumber thought of an ice slide at first.

    On the other hand I expect the physical quality "slippery" to be paired with another physical quality, so I understand "cool" to refer to the temperature. There is nothing in the sentence itself to make me think that this is "cool" meaning great. I agree with Driven in post #4 that if this was a great slide it would be phrased differently.
     
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