the smaller car makes 18 miles per gallon

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polyglotwannabe

Senior Member
Spanish
Hi, dear friends:
The following is a math problem I am translating
Two cars will travel from jacksonville to miami a distance of 327 miles.
the smaller car makes 35 miles per gallon and the larger car makes 18 miles per gallon.
can you say approximately
how many fewer gallons will the smaller car use than the larger car?.
My try:
zwei autos fahren von jacksonville nach miami eine distanz von 327 meilen.
Das kleinere Auto fährt 35 Meilen mit eine Gallone und das größere Auto fährt 18 Meilen pro Gallone.
Können Sie ungefähr sagen
wie viele Gallonen weniger das kleinere Auto verbraucht als das größere?

Is this pro Gallone too forced here or does it sound good , or is there a better way?.
thanks for your priceless help,
poly
 
  • JClaudeK

    Senior Member
    Français France, Deutsch (SW-Dtl.)
    Das kleinere Auto fährt 35 Meilen mit eine Gallone und das größere Auto fährt 18 Meilen pro Gallone.
    Hier sagt man das meistens umgekehrt:
    Das kleinere Auto verbraucht eine Gallone auf 35 Meilen und das größere Auto (verbraucht eine Gallone) auf 18 Meilen.

    Cf.:
    den Spritverbrauch berechnen
    mit nur einem Klick erfahren Sie, wie viele Liter Sprit Sie auf 100 Kilometer verbraucht haben.
     

    διαφορετικός

    Senior Member
    Swiss German - Switzerland
    Das kleinere Auto fährt 35 Meilen mit eine Gallone und das größere Auto fährt 18 Meilen pro Gallone.
    I prefer the variant "pro Gallone", because "pro" is more abstract than "mit". "Pro" is often used to express a ratio.
    When I hear "mit einer Gallone", I tend to think that the vehicle has only one gallon of fuel in its tank.
     

    Gernot Back

    Senior Member
    German - Germany
    Das kleinere Auto fährt 35 Meilen mit eine Gallone und das größere Auto fährt 18 Meilen pro Gallone.
    In technical German, you would say:

    Zwei Autos fahren von Bremen nach Heidelberg, eine Strecke von 524 Kilometern.
    Das kleinere Auto hat eine Reichweite von 12,39 und das größere eine von 6,37 Kilometern pro Liter.
    Können Sie näherungsweise sagen, um wie viele Liter geringer der Verbrauch des kleineren Autos auf diese Distanz ist?
     

    Frank78

    Senior Member
    German
    Das kleinere Auto hat eine Reichweite von 12,39 und das größere eine von 6,37 Kilometern pro Liter.
    Miles per gallon or kilometres per liter are still "consumption" and not "range".

    "Reichweite" is normally reserved for the maximum travel distance with the current gas level in your tank.
     

    polyglotwannabe

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    I prefer the variant "pro Gallone", because "pro" is more abstract than "mit". "Pro" is often used to express a ratio.
    When I hear "mit einer Gallone", I tend to think that the vehicle has only one gallon of fuel in its tank.
    Yes, you're right. I will have to qualify that with
    Sprit not to be ambiguous. As in,
    Das kleinere Auto kann 35 Meilen mit einer Gallone Sprit fahren.
    Thanks, good point.
     

    Frank78

    Senior Member
    German
    That is what I thought. It is like in English. Gas being the short, colloquial, informal way of saying gasoline
    The difference is rather what's included.

    Kraftstoff = fuel (gas, diesel, kersosine, hydrogen, natural gas)

    Sprit = (I don't think there's an English word which just covers these two) = gas or diesel
     

    polyglotwannabe

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    The difference is rather what's included.

    Kraftstoff = fuel (gas, diesel, kersosine, hydrogen, natural gas)

    Sprit = (I don't think there's an English word which just covers these two) = gas or diesel
    No, you're right. At least, I have not heard but gas and diesel. Yes, I see where you 're coming from.
     

    polyglotwannabe

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    :thumbsup:
    We don't use "Gallonen" and "Meilen", in the German-speaking countries. We use "Liter" and "Kilometer".
    That is good to know. Even if we want to get the students to become familiar with the American metric system ( like Alemanita pointed out in one of her posts) it would not be amiss if we ourselves get familiar with the German metric system. This system is also used in my beloved native Cuba.
     

    Frank78

    Senior Member
    German
    Consumption is usually measured in liters per 100 kilometers and not kilometers per liter.
    In Europe and for CAR engines. You can also measure it in weight/volume per time or weight per work.

    Calling it Reichweite makes absolutely no sense: "Mein Auto hat eine Reichweite von 10km pro Liter" is a pointless statement without know how much fuel is in your tank. And all cars I know of display "mpg" and kpl" as "consumption".

    :thumbsup:
    l/100km = Verbrauch
    mpg = Reichweite
    The difference between theory and practice.

    Reichweite = km (or kilometers per liter multiplied by liters (of fuel in your tank))
    Verbrauch = mpg, kpl, l/100km

    You can convert one into the other, so it MUST be the same thing.
     
    Last edited:

    berndf

    Moderator
    German (Germany)
    Consumption is usually measured in liters per 100 kilometers and not kilometers per liter. I think, even though not usual, Reichweite pro Liter is much more appropriate here!
    Absolutely not. Reichweite has a well established and definite meaning in the automotive industry. I agree that for what mpg measures the term consumption is inappropriate but Reichweite is not inappropriate as well. The quantity measured in mpg is called fuel efficiency.

    Perhaps makes 35 mpg could be translated as schafft 35 pro Gallone.

    Das kleinere Auto hat eine Reichweite von 12,39 und das größere eine von 6,37 Kilometern pro Liter.
    35 mpg corresponds to 14.88 km/l and 18 mpg to 7.65 km/l. The context is clearly US and not imp. gallons.
     
    Last edited:
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