the sort of anxiety of his penis to come to its little evacuating crisis seemed farcical.

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longxianchen

Senior Member
chinese
Hi,
Here are some words from the novel Lady Chatterley's Lover(the first paragraph, page 252, chapter 12) by Lawrence (planetebook,here):

And when he said, with a sort of little sigh: ‘Eh, tha’rt nice!’ something in her quivered, and something in her spirit stiffened in resistance: stiffened from the terribly physical intimacy, and from the peculiar haste of his possession. And this time the sharp ecstasy of her own passion did not overcome her; she lay with her ends inert on his striving body, and do what she might, her spirit seemed to look on from the top of her head, and the butting of his haunches seemed ridiculous to her, and the sort of anxiety of his penis to come to its little evacuating crisis seemed farcical.

The sentence with blue words in is quite difficult for me.
Now I know ends is a typo for hands. But I'm not quite clear about the meaning of the part in blue, especially the words evacuating crisis. Now I rephrase the part as: the anxiety that his penis wishes to come to its little orgasm, the kind of queezing out all its semen, (seemed farcical.)

Is that right please?
Thank you in advance
 
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  • Yes. DHL is speaking of orgasm/ejaculation where the penis emits (evacuates) semen.

    Metaphorically, the penis has 'anxiety', concern (maybe worry), about reaching that goal.

    Metaphorically, the penis is 'trying' to reach its goal, having 'anxiety' about reaching it. Of course it's the man trying, actually.
     
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    longxianchen

    Senior Member
    chinese
    Thank you. But seems to me that we might say the sort of anxiety for his penis to come to its little rather than the sort of anxiety of his penis to come to its little in modern English, e.g. for somebody to do something rather than of somebody to do something.
    So why did Lawrence write that way please?
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    Yes, the penis does come in for personification fairly often. If you've read Lady Chatterley, you'll see that the penis is given the name John Thomas and woman's genitals are called Lady Jane.
    Eh well, tha're more cocky than me, an' tha says less. John Thomas! Dost want her? Dost want my lady Jane? (Chapter 14)
    It is normal therefore for Connie to think of the penis being anxious rather than Mellors being anxious.
     
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    hectacon

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    Yes, the penis does come in for personification fairly often. If you've read Lady Chatterley, you'll see that the penis is given the name John Thomas and woman's genitals are called Lady Jane.

    It is normal therefore for Connie to think of the penis being anxious rather than Mellors being anxious.

    Thank you. But seems to me that we might say the sort of anxiety for his penis to come to its little rather than the sort of anxiety of his penis to come to its little in modern English, e.g. for somebody to do something rather than of somebody to do something.
    So why did Lawrence write that way please?

    Are we allowed to discuss about this things in this forum ?:confused::confused:
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    Yes, we are allowed to discuss this as long as the question has to do with understanding the way words are used.
     
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