the spike music sales see when a popular artist dies

Discussion in 'English Only' started by LQZ, Oct 9, 2011.

  1. LQZ

    LQZ Senior Member

    Canada
    Mandarin
    Reuters reported that Janney Montgomery Scott analyst Bill Choi thinks store traffic and “sentiment-related purchases” are likely to get a bump, but nothing on par with the spike music sales see when a popular artist dies. The Washington Post

    Dear all,

    I suspect see should be seen. Is it a typo? Thanks.


    LQZ
     
  2. boozer Senior Member

    Bulgaria
    Bulgarian
    Whatever makes you think that, LQZ? This is a statement about the general present in the present simple tense - "music sales see a spike every time a popular artist dies..."
     
  3. Cagey post mod (English Only / Latin)

    California
    English - US
    No, 'see' is correct:
    but it's nothing on a par
    with the spike
    [that] music sales see.


    Music sales 'see' a spike when a popular artist dies.
    The bump (temporary increase) is much less than that spike.

    Here 'see' means something like 'experience'. I can see why you found it difficult to follow. It's odd to think of sales seeing anything.
     
    Last edited: Oct 9, 2011
  4. LQZ

    LQZ Senior Member

    Canada
    Mandarin
    Thank you, Cagey and boozer.

    I misread the sentence; I read "the spike music sales" together. :(
     
  5. Thomas Tompion Senior Member

    Southern England
    English - England
    It could have been but nothing on a par with the spike seen in music sales when a popular artist dies.

    That use of see to mean to show, to exhibit, or, as Cagey suggests, to experience, is a strange anthropomorphism. I don't think it's in the WR dictionary, though it's in M-W as 2a: to have experience of : undergo.
     
  6. LQZ

    LQZ Senior Member

    Canada
    Mandarin
    Thank you, TT. :)
     

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